ShareThis Page

Newsmaker: Lewis Irwin

| Thursday, Nov. 1, 2012, 12:02 a.m.
Lew Irwin, Duquesne prof who penned book on rebuilding Afghanistan

Lewis Irwin

Newsworthy: His newest book, “Disjointed Ways, Disunified Means: Learning from America's Struggle to Build an Afghan Nation,” outlines reforms that would enable the country to achieve strategic goals in spite of constrained resources and emerging threats.

Residence: Peters

Age: 48

Family: Wife, Marcia; daughter Mary, a West Point alumna and second lieutenant; daughter Eva, who is studying to be a teacher; and son Andrew, a freshman at West Point.

Occupation: Associate professor of political science at Duquesne University and brigadier general in the Army Reserves.

Education: Bachelor of Science, West Point; Masters and Doctorate in Political Science, Yale.

Background: Served in the first Gulf War and did a brief mission in Iraq in 2005, gathering information on lessons learned for the Army. His book is based on his experience in Afghanistan from 2007 to 2008 when he led a task force to design and implement a reform of the Afghan police.

Quote: “I have the best of all worlds. I am a practitioner in American government in the executive establishment and I get a chance to bring my experience and observations to the classroom at Duquesne. It's been a very good fit.”

— Debra Erdley

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.