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Newsmaker: Snezana Stefanovic

Snezana Stefanovic, a second-year biochemistry doctoral student, was recently selected to receive a 2013 Education Travel Award for the Biophysical Society’s 57th annual meeting in Philadelphia in February. Stefanovic received this highly competitive award on scientific merit and will be honored at the Education, Minority Affairs and Professional Opportunities for Women Committees Travel Awardee Reception. She earned this recognition because of her extensive research regarding the Fragile X syndrome, the most common form of inherited mental retardation. Working in the research group of Dr. Rita Mihailescu, associate professor of chemistry and biochemistry, she used a variety of biochemical and biophysical methods to try to elucidate the mechanisms by which a missing cellular protein impacts RNA translation. Born in Belgrade, Serbia, Stefanovic came to the U.S. in 2008 to earn her master’s degree in chemical engineering at Youngstown State University. She chose to pursue her doctorate at Duquesne after learning about the ground-breaking, hands-on research conducted in the department of chemistry and biochemistry.

By Thomas Olson
Thursday, Dec. 20, 2012, 9:48 p.m.
 

Noteworthy: Will receive the 2013 Education Travel Award from the Biophysical Society on Feb. 2 in Philadelphia for her research in Fragile X Syndrome, the most common form of inherited mental retardation

Family: Husband, Dusan

Age: 30

Residence: Mt. Washington

Occupation: Second-year biochemistry doctoral student at Duquesne University

Background: Born in Belgrade, Serbia, Stefanovic came to the United States in 2008 to pursue post-secondary studies.

Education: Undergraduate degree in biochemical engineering from the University of Belgrade, Serbia, in 2007; master's degree in chemical engineering from Youngstown State University in 2009

Quote: “When I was back home in Serbia in high school, I was very good in math and chemistry and biology. And the best way to combine all three of them was to pursue biochemical engineering.”

 

 
 


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