TribLIVE

| News

 
Larger text Larger text Smaller text Smaller text | Order Photo Reprints

Errors on Allegheny County property assessments blamed on computer

Email Newsletters

Click here to sign up for one of our email newsletters.

'American Coyotes' Series

Traveling by Jeep, boat and foot, Tribune-Review investigative reporter Carl Prine and photojournalist Justin Merriman covered nearly 2,000 miles over two months along the border with Mexico to report on coyotes — the human traffickers who bring illegal immigrants into the United States. Most are Americans working for money and/or drugs. This series reports how their operations have a major impact on life for residents and the environment along the border — and beyond.

By Bobby Kerlik
Monday, Dec. 10, 2012, 11:56 p.m.
 

An Allegheny County assessment official said on Monday that about 100 people who appealed their property assessment received erroneous results because of a computer glitch.

“We are going through the dispositions to determine how many there are. I believe it's about 100,” said David Montgomery, solicitor for the Board of Property Assessment and Review. “We're identifying them and resending the correct dispositions.”

The errors generally occurred in results for people who received a reduction in assessed value through an informal appeal — the first step in the process — and then appealed again to the Board of Property Assessment and Review.

The errors occurred in properties for which values increased back to the 2013 assessed value, effectively wiping out the reduction in the first appeal.

Montgomery said the glitch was that the reduced values from the first appeal did not make it through the computer system for the second appeal.

That's what happened to Terri Parker, 58, of Elizabeth Township, whose house nearly doubled in value from $115,000 to $210,900 with the new assessment. She won a reduction through an informal appeal to about $173,000 but said that is still too high.

Parker appealed and had a hearing with the Board of Property Assessment and Review. When she received her result, the assessment was back up to $210,900.

“It seems to me there's been too many mistakes. It's still too high,” Parker said. “The public officials need to know the lives they're affecting. When I got the $210,900 assessment, I burst into tears. I can't afford to live in my house, and who's going to buy it at what they say it's worth?”

Montgomery said it's possible that a legitimate rise in value can occur during appeals before the board, but it's rare. He said Parker's erroneous value will be rescinded and her case will be reviewed.

Montgomery said he informed the Board of Viewers, the next level to appeal, of the problem because some people may be appealing erroneous values.

Bobby Kerlik is a staff writer for Trib Total Media. He can be reached at 412-320-7886 or bkerlik@tribweb.com.

Subscribe today! Click here for our subscription offers.

 

 


Show commenting policy

Most-Read Allegheny

  1. W.Va. authorities charge 87 with drug trafficking
  2. Rising East Liberty out of reach for Pittsburgh’s poor
  3. Western Pa.’s ties to 2016 White House race extend beyond Santorum
  4. Pittsburgh man jailed on theft, assault and drug charges
  5. Remains of 4 early colonial leaders discovered at Jamestown
  6. Projects advance through Pittsburgh planning commission despite opposition
  7. Service restored following water main break in Baldwin Borough
  8. Bill seeks to give Pittsburgh police license plate info
  9. Tablets for Allegheny County Jail inmates deemed a success
  10. Former Steelers lineman Hartings to be honored for youth volunteering
  11. Path to authenticity led North Side pastor to God