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Peters High named tops in lip dubbing

| Wednesday, Dec. 19, 2012, 11:48 p.m.
Representatives from Trib Total Media present a $5,000 grand prize check to students and faculty at Peters Township High School after the school won the Trib Sponsored, High School Lip Dub contest, at Peters High School, Wednesday, December 19, 2012. Pictured left to right is Media teacher Kevin Bastos, Principal Lori Pavlik, Media teacher Robin Hodgin-frick, Students Alex Hvizdos, Christian Nossokoff, Hannah Squeglia, Ralph Martin president and CEO of Trib Total Media and Lynn Swann.

To students and staff at Peters Township High School, winning Trib Total Media's first Lip Dub Contest meant more than the $5,000 award — it was a symbol of their school spirit.

“It's about the sense of pride in what we do,” Principal Lori Pavlik told students who packed the school's gym for a check presentation Wednesday. “It represents everything we want to be.”

More than 500 students participated in the project, spearheaded by the school's Media Department and Video Club. The contest invited students to show their school spirit by producing a music video of people lip-syncing to a popular song — a “lip dub.”

Fifteen schools entered, and Trib Total Media readers voted online for their favorites. Sponsors were The Gold Buyers of Pittsburgh and the Pittsburgh Power.

There were 95,000 votes, with Peters garnering 30,080. Winning earned the school $5,000 along with 100 contest T-shirts. Media teachers Robin Hodgin-Frick and Kevin Bastos oversaw the students' work. Hannah Squeglia, 18, served as director; Alex Hvizdos, 17, was audio director; and Christian Nossokoff, 18, was cameraman. All are seniors.

First-place runner-up Greater Latrobe received $1,000 along with 100 T-shirts.

In a savvy public relations move, Peters students reached out to Pittsburgh native and writer/director Stephen Chbosky, who filmed scenes in “The Perks of Being a Wallflower” at the school, to help get the word out. Chbosky tweeted about it.

Set to Katy Perry's “Firework,” the video shows students lip-synching as they maneuver through the school's hallways, passing through groups of students organized by clubs and sports teams.

“It was a great experience to have all those groups come together,” said Nossokoff.

Trib Total Media president and CEO Ralph Martin and former Steelers great Lynn Swann presented the school with a check. Swann called the accomplishment a “credit to your teamwork.”

“Each one of you did a great job,” he said. “That demonstrates how strong a community you are.”

Rachel Weaver is a staff writer for Trib Total Media. She can be reached at 412-320-7948 or rweaver@tribweb.com.

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