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Scripps Howard Foundation honors Tribune-Review reporters Kilzer, Conte

| Friday, March 15, 2013, 12:01 a.m.

The Scripps Howard Foundation announced on Thursday that Tribune-Review reporters Lou Kilzer and Andrew Conte have won the William Brewster Styles Award recognizing outstanding national business and economics reporting.

Kilzer and Conte, working with investigations editor Jim Wilhelm, were recognized for $hadow Economy, a series of stories last year about the impacts of corporations and individuals hiding money in offshore accounts. More than half of the world's cash — as much as $25 trillion — passes through financial havens that shelter it from tax collectors, shareholders, partners and wives.

The series explained the drain these secret accounts have on the U.S. and world economies, hindering growth for poorer nations.

The reporters revealed how anyone can set up a shell corporation with an offshore account for less than $1,000 in Belize. Read the series online at www.Shadow-Economy.com.

The Scripps Howard Foundation's awards competition, established in 1953, annually recognizes outstanding print, broadcast and online journalism by U.S.-based news organizations as well as top media educators. Other winners of the 2012 awards and $10,000 prizes each, except where noted, include:

• Spencer S. Hsu of The Washington Post, who received the Ursula and Gilbert Farfel Prize in investigative reporting and $15,000 for a series that exposed the Justice Department's use of flawed data in more than 20,000 criminal convictions.

• Michael M. Phillips of The Wall Street Journal, who received the Ernie Pyle Award in human interest storytelling for “War's Wake,” a chronicle of America's newest post-war generation and the manner in which Iraq and Afghanistan have marked the nation's psyche.

• Patricia Callahan, Sam Roe and Michael Hawthorne of the Chicago Tribune, who received the Roy W. Howard Award for “Playing with Fire.” The series exposed how the chemical and tobacco industries waged a deceptive, decades-long campaign to promote the use of flame-retardant furniture.

• The Denver Post received the Breaking News award for its coverage of the Aurora, Colo., theater shooting that left 12 dead and 58 injured.

• The New York Times, which received the Digital Innovation trophy for a portfolio of work that included “Snow Fall,” which chronicled the harrowing story of 16 expert skiers caught in an avalanche at Tunnel Creek, Wash.

Winners will receive a total of $175,000 in prizes and trophies at an awards dinner May 9 in the Waldorf Astoria hotel in Naples, Fla. The event is co-hosted by the Scripps Howard Foundation, E.W. Scripps Co. and the Naples Daily News, a Scripps publication.

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