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Key players in the Pittsburgh Police scandal

| Saturday, March 23, 2013, 12:01 a.m.

• Nate Harper, 60, former chief, forced to resign Feb. 20 by Mayor Luke Ravenstahl because of the federal investigation.

• Cynthia Harper, 58, Harper's wife and a retired Pittsburgh police officer who once worked as a consultant for Victory Security.

• Art Bedway, 63, Harper's one-time friend, owner of Victory Security, accused of conspiring with a city worker and unidentified others to set up Alpha Outfitters to win a $327,000 contract to install computers in police vehicles. A federal grand jury indicted him for defrauding the government in connection with the contract.

• Acting Chief Regina McDonald, 63, former assistant chief of administration who oversaw department's Special Events Office; promoted Feb. 20.

• Sandy Ganster, 57, manager of the police Personnel and Finance Office, whose lawyer says she went to Public Safety Director Michael Huss on Feb. 9 with concerns about spending from an unauthorized account at the Greater Pittsburgh Federal Credit Union. She is one of eight city employees with a debit card tied to a credit union account.

• Tamara Davis, 46, chief clerk in the police Personnel and Finance Office who reports to Ganster. Had a debit card tied to a credit union account. One of four police department employees who founded Diverse Public Safety Consultants LLC with Harper. Placed on leave by McDonald on Feb. 21.

• Officer Tonya Montgomery-Ford, 43, formerly assigned to Assistant Chief of Operations Maurita Bryant, member of Diverse Public Safety Consultants and D&T Enterprises, which had police contracts and owns Police Memories, a merchandise business. Placed on leave by McDonald on Feb. 21.

• Kim Montgomery, 60, civilian clerk in Personnel and Finance, mother of Montgomery-Ford and connected to D&T Enterprises. Placed on leave by McDonald on Feb. 21.

• Sgt. Barry Budd, 47, heads police intelligence squad. Member of Diverse Public Safety Consultants.

• Cmdr. Eric Holmes, 43, heads Zone 2 station in the Hill District. Member of Diverse Public Safety Consultants.

• Sgt. Matthew Gauntner, 42, a Ravenstahl bodyguard. Had debit card tied to credit union account; records show he never used the card.

• Sgt. Dominick Sciulli, 41, Ravenstahl bodyguard with a debit card tied to a credit union account. The account statement shows 15 charges between Jan. 22, 2009, and Nov. 11, 2011, totaling $1,812.

• Fred Crawford, 48, retired Ravenstahl bodyguard who claimed the mayor knew about the credit union account and relied on it to conceal expenses.

• Deputy Chief Paul Donaldson, 61, second-in-command of the police bureau. A debit card tied to a credit union account was issued in his name; he said he was unaware of the card and never used it.

• Assistant Chief of Operations Maurita Bryant, 60, oversees patrol branch. She said she was unaware of a credit union debit card issued in her name and never used it.

• Christine Kebr, 56, former city employee accused of conspiring with Bedway and others to set up Alpha Outfitters to win a city contract. She pleaded guilty to conspiracy and awaits sentencing.

• Sgt. Gordon McDaniel, 47, oversees police vehicle fleet. In January, he testified before federal grand jury investigating whether Harper played a role in awarding the Alpha Outfitters contract to Bedway's company.

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