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Forsythe mini golf course a no-go in Carnegie

Andrew Russell | Tribune-Review - Forsythe Miniature Golf and Snacks at the edge of Carnegie Park has been a fixture in the South Hills for seven decades, but the family that owns it isn’t opening it this year.
<div style='float:right;width:100%;' align='right'><em>Andrew Russell  |  Tribune-Review</em></div>Forsythe Miniature Golf and Snacks at the edge of Carnegie Park has been a fixture in the South Hills for seven decades, but the family that owns it isn’t opening it this year.
- Forsythe Miniature Golf and Snacks at the edge of Carnegie Park has been a fixture in the South Hills for seven decades, but the family that owns it isn’t opening it this year.
Forsythe Miniature Golf and Snacks at the edge of Carnegie Park has been a fixture in the South Hills for seven decades, but the family that owns it isn’t opening it this year.

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Thursday, May 9, 2013, 11:27 p.m.
 

Forsythe Miniature Golf and Snacks in Carnegie will be closed this summer for the first time in seven decades.

The tree-lined, 18-hole mini golf course and candy shop off Forsythe Road, at the edge of Carnegie Park, is a well-known recreation spot in the south suburbs that has been family-operated since it opened in 1942. But Sue Stasiuk of Boston, niece of owner Wanda Forsythe Clay, said, “Everybody is going in different directions right now” and can't run the business this year.

Keeping the course closed — it's only open in the summer — was a hard decision, but family members are comfortable with it, she said. “This has been coming for a while,” she said.

Carnegie Mayor Jack Kobistek said it's a loss for the area. He has lived in the borough for more than 20 years and raised his family there.

“My kids are going to be disappointed — my whole family is,” he said. “We've golfed at that little golf course since my kids were little, and they're teenagers now. Now they go golf with their friends.”

Stasiuk's great-great-uncle, George Lang, came up with the idea for the golf course in 1939 as he sought solace over his wife's death. He approached Joe Forsythe, who is his great-nephew and Stasiuk's grandfather, about building the complex on Forsythe's property on Cooks Lane.

Numerous family members have owned and maintained the course.

“Four of us over time took over, after my grandmother and grandfather handed it over to us,” Stasiuk said. “It's a very homespun business and always has been.”

She said the family has made no decision about the course's future beyond this summer.

Megan Guza is a staff writer for Trib Total Media. She can be reached at 412-388-5810 or mguza@tribweb.com.

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