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Bon Air woman completes run for Boston Marathon victims

| Wednesday, May 15, 2013, 9:42 p.m.
Sidney Davis | Tribune-Review
Distance runner Kaitlyn Kacsuta completes the final miles of her quest to run 180 miles in 26 days on Wednesday May 15, 2013 at the South Side Riverfront Trail as a way to honor and raise money for the families of those killed or injured in a pair of bombings April 15 at the finish line of the Boston Marathon.
Sidney Davis | Tribune-Review
Distance runner Kaitlyn Kacsuta completes the final miles of her quest to run 180 miles in 26 days on Wednesday May 15, 2013 at the South side Riverfront Trail as a way to honor and raise money for the families of the victims killed and those injured in a pair of bombings April 15 at the finish line of the Boston Marathon.

Distance runner Kaitlyn Kacsuta on Wednesday finished raising money for the victims of the Boston Marathon bombings by running a few easy miles along the Monongahela River in the South Side.

The Tribune-Review in April wrote about Kacsuta's plan to run 180 miles in precisely 26 days to honor those injured and killed in a pair of bombings near the finish line of the prestigious 26.2-mile race on April 15. Kacsuta, 25, of Bon Air ran the Boston Marathon and was in a building near the finish line when she heard the explosions.

The third-year Duquesne University law school student committed to doing the runs amid a busy schedule of final exams and studying so that she could raise money for The One Fund Boston, a victims relief fund that has collected more than $30.1 million.

Fellow runners and those who heard about Kacsuta's effort on Twitter, Facebook and YouTube gave hundreds of dollars in donations in their own names and hers, she said.

“I'm just glad I got some people to donate to One Fund Boston,” Kacsuta said.

Kacsuta chronicled her distances by posting snapshots of her GPS-enabled Garmin running watch on Twitter after each run. She said the experience was rewarding but challenging. She typically ran 7 to 8 miles a day.

“The last week or so, I felt kind of drained,” she said. “My legs just don't have the giddy-up that they would normally.”

Her longest run was 13.1 miles May 5 at the Pittsburgh Half-Marathon, which she finished in 1:41:34.

Jeremy Boren is a staff writer for Trib Total Media. He can be reached at 412-320-7935 or jboren@tribweb.com.

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