Share This Page

South Side group sponsors wide range of activities outdoors

| Saturday, May 18, 2013, 9:17 p.m.
Andrew Russell | Tribune-Review
Lucy keeps watch at the bow of Crafton Heights resident, Brad Ryan's kayak at Point State Park during the Venture Outdoors Festival, Saturday. The event featured activities like fishing, kayaking and frisbee golf at Point State Park.
Andrew Russell | Tribune-Review
Kayakers line up to board their kayaks at Point State Park as part of the Venture Outdoors Festival, Saturday. The event featured activities like fishing, kayaking and frisbee golf at Point State Park.
Andrew Russell | Tribune-Review
Alissa Frederick of Ross Township fishes with her daughter, Keira Frederick, 2 during the Venture Outdoors Festival, Saturday. The event featured activities like fishing, kayaking and frisbee golf at Point State Park.
Andrew Russell | Tribune-Review
Brad Ryan of Crafton Heights grabs his dog Lucy out of the water after she jumped out of his kayak at Point State Park during the Venture Outdoors Festival, Saturday. The event featured activities like fishing, kayaking and frisbee golf at Point State Park.
Andrew Russell | Tribune-Review
Ryan Walter, 13, of North Strabane gets sprayed by water pumped using the power of a bicycle during the Venture Outdoors Festival, Saturday, May 18, 2013. The bikes were set up by Zero Fossil as a fun way to illustrate the amount of power generated by a bicycle. The event featured activities like fishing, kayaking and Frisbee golf at Point State Park.

Janet Frankert always had been curious about kayaking but never had put paddle to water — until Saturday.

“It's something you can pick up pretty easily, as long as you have some coordination,” said Frankert, 53, still in her life vest after taking a kayak out for a spin on the Allegheny River by Point State Park.

Frankert of Castle Shannon was among more than 8,000 people expected for an all-day celebration of recreation sponsored by Venture Outdoors Inc., a nonprofit group based in the South Side.

“This is meant to get people outside and familiar with all the activities in Western Pennsylvania, especially on the rivers,” said Alyson Walls, marketing coordinator for Venture Outdoors.

It has organized its annual Venture Outdoors Festival for 13 years.

Kayaking tends to be the most popular activity, usually pulling a couple of thousand people into the water each year. But the festival featured much more, including a climbing wall, biking, fishing (rods and bait included) and a host of games aimed at young children.

“It's a great day for this, just what we'd hoped for,” said Dave Johnston, director of marketing for the outdoor group of Dick's Sporting Goods Inc., regarding the sunny day in the 70s.

Based in Findlay, Dick's sponsored the event for the first time. The company also set up a “game zone” that featured horseshoes, croquet, bocce and other games.

Dick's was one of 66 vendors with activity or informational booths that ranged from yoga instruction to rivers preservation.

Ericha Geppert and family participated in an outdoor Treasure hunt known as “geocaching.” Players armed with smartphones containing GPS capability walk to about 10 destinations and try to answer a question about each site.

“It's walking and learning,” said Geppert, 23, of Friendship, who was joined by her mother, two sisters and brother, who purposefully parked in the Strip District to enjoy the walking trek to the festival at Point State Park.

The Howell family of Verona managed to take in two outside events: the Venture Outdoors Festival and earlier, the Highmark Walk for a Healthy Community, a 5-kilometer walk on the North Shore.

“The mission today was to wear out the kids,” said Charles Howell, 39, with a broad smile as he stood with his wife and two young daughters.

Thomas Olson is a Trib Total Media staff writer. He can be reached at 412-320-7854 or tolson@tribweb.com.

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.