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Newsmaker: Dr. Lakshmanan Krishnamurti

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Dr. Lakshmanan Krishnamurti, a hematologist at Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC, received a $2 million grant from the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute to develop an online tool for patients and families with sickle cell disease to determine the best course of treatment according to their condition and desired lifestyle.

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Thursday, June 20, 2013, 12:01 a.m.
 

Age: 55

Residence: O'Hara

Family: Wife, Uma; Sons, Nachiket and Bharat

Education: M.D. from the Armed Forces Medical College, Pune, India, 1980

Background: Dr. Krishnamurti is clinical director of hematology in the Division of Hematology/Oncology at Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC. His research has focused on sickle cell disease, a hereditary condition where red blood cells are crescent-shaped, sticky and rigid, causing pain, eventual organ shutdown and reduced life expectancy. While a bone marrow transplant can provide a cure, it requires a long hospital stay and immunosuppressant drugs or chemotherapy.

Notable: Dr. Krishnamurti received a $2 million research award from the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute to develop an online tool for people with sickle cell disease. While several treatments are available for the disease, each carries risks and side effects. Dr. Krishnamurti hopes his project can make it easier for patients to find the treatment that suits their condition and needs.

Quote: “Some people will do anything to cure their disease, others feel like they've lived so long with their disease that they don't want a treatment that has just a chance of a cure... This particular project will provide a web-based tool so that patients and families can decide what's important to them.”

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