TribLIVE

| News


 
Larger text Larger text Smaller text Smaller text | Order Photo Reprints

Pittsburgh's water rescuers learn how to 'work smarter'

About Margaret Harding

By Margaret Harding

Published: Saturday, June 15, 2013, 12:01 a.m.

As Pittsburgh firefighter Joe King leaned on a paddle and picked his way across Slippery Rock Creek on Friday morning, he lost his footing and began floating downstream.

He grabbed at the ropes firefighters and police officers tossed his way from shore, finally grasping one after about 100 yards. Public Safety Director Michael Huss and Fraternal Order of Police Fort Pitt Lodge No. 1 President Michael LaPorte pulled him to safety.

“It was a good exercise for these guys,” said King, the president of the International Association of Firefighters Local No. 1. “Not that I wanted to be the stooge. When I saw them two, I knew they were going to catch me.”

King, LaPorte — a police sergeant — and Huss were among the 18 public safety employees learning water rescue and emergency response skills at the creek in McConnells Mill State Park in Lawrence County. A storm created a flash flood on Washington Boulevard in Highland Park in August 2011 that killed four people, prompting Huss to train all public safety employees in shore-based water rescues. Roughly 200 employees — largely firefighters — are learning the more advanced rescue techniques this year.

“What's really dangerous is flash flooding and urban flooding,” Huss said. “There's no doubt in my mind this training will save lives in the future.”

The firefighters, including battalion chiefs who volunteered for the training, work at stations in Homewood, Hazelwood, Brookline, Elliott and Lawrenceville. Those stations, which are near flood-prone areas, will have boats available to rescuers. Police officers and paramedics also volunteered for the training.

“With Washington Boulevard, we had no advance warning,” Huss said. “We have to be able to go at a moment's notice.”

The trainees, wearing dry suits, special boots, gloves, personal flotation devices and helmets, learned defensive swimming, how to work in a team to rescue simulated victims, how to move from fast-moving to calmer waters and other skills during the day-long exercise.

“We teach people to work smarter, not harder,” said Sgt. Thomas Huerbin, one of the instructors. “It's not like swimming in a pool; you're swimming to save your life, basically.”

Plenty of the students learned the creek was aptly named, as they slipped and slid over treacherous rocks in the water and along the shoreline. Still, many said they were happy to be learning the skills.

“This is an awesome program,” Firefighter David Cunningham said. “When you have someone drowning in a city street and you're not trained, it's the worst feeling in the world.”

Margaret Harding is a staff writer for Trib Total Media. She can be reached at 412-380-8519 ormharding@tribweb.com.

 

 

 
 


Show commenting policy

Most-Read Allegheny

  1. Former PPG executive indicted in fatal N.H. crash
  2. Wilkinsburg woman, 24, dies in crash
  3. Democrats consider Pittsburgh for 2016 national convention
  4. Trial begins in Steelers stabbing
  5. Wuerl tells faithful all Catholics are responsible for schools
  6. Landmark former school in Pittsburgh’s Hill District to incubate startups
  7. Proposal to drill in West Deer and Frazer draws comments from both sides
  8. Post 9/11 veterans lend skills to community leadership course
  9. 4-car crash near Fox Chapel snarls Route 28 traffic
  10. 1 of 2 men on trial in slaying outside Montgomery County bar
  11. Bullied South Fayette student’s case prompts wiretap overhaul legislation
Subscribe today! Click here for our subscription offers.