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Jeannette brother, sister score big in Squirrel Hill Lego contest

| Wednesday, July 3, 2013, 12:06 a.m.

The high point of Steven and Kylie Tabor's vacation in Myrtle Beach might be the news they got from a toy store in Squirrel Hill.

Beset by lousy beach weather in South Carolina, the brother and sister from Jeannette learned on Tuesday they placed first and second in their age groups in the annual Lego competition at S.W. Randall Toyes and Giftes store on Forbes Avenue.

“They were screaming and carrying on. They were so excited,” said their grandmother, Anne Tabor, who called the pair to share the news.

The store announced Tuesday the winners of their ninth annual Lego competition. The competition drew 136 entries, which crowded the front window of the store. Family, friends, customers and passers-by cast more than 300 votes for sculptures in four age categories, managers at the store said.

Steven, 5, won the 5-and-under group for the second year in a row. His sculpture, “Pirates Win the World Series,” featured PNC Park, A.J. Burnett on the mound, Andrew McCutchen in the outfield and a scoreboard with “Let's Go Bucs” spelled in Lego bricks. His sister, Kylie, 7, took second in the 6 to 10 age group with her depiction of a YMCA swim meet.

Finn Woods, 7, won the 6 to 10 division with, “Time Traveling,” a dinosaur-type creature made of white bricks. Laura Brodkey, 11, won the 11 to 15 age group with, “The Palace.” Josh Hall, 30, of Bethel Park and his creation, “Sidney CrosBrick,” a 10-inch, bionic statue of the Pittsburgh Penguins captain, took top honors in the 16-and-over division.

S.W. Randall will leave the sculptures on display in its front window until July 4.

Aaron Aupperlee is a Staff Writer with Trib Total Media.

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