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Skatepark on way for Carnegie Park

| Sunday, July 7, 2013, 11:24 p.m.

Mary Pitcher's delayed dream of building a skatepark in memory of her sons became a tangible one on Sunday evening.

Organizers broke ground for Pitcher Park Memorial Skatepark in Carnegie Park, nearly five years to the day after two of her sons, Stephen and Vincent, drowned during a camping trip at Kinzua Reservoir.

“This is an exciting day,” said Pitcher of Scott. “This is a very exciting day.”

Leaders picked Carnegie Park after considering sites in Dormont, Mt. Lebanon and Scott.

Carnegie Mayor Jack Kobistek called the park a “godsend.”

“This will be a nice, wholesome, safe place for kids to play,” he said. “This will be an avenue for them to take their skills to the next level.”

Seattle-based Grindline Skateparks designed the park and will carry out construction, which begins Aug. 1. The finished park will include a large, full pipe, a bowl 4 to 6 feet deep, a bowl 8 to 10 feet deep and a street course with various obstacles.

A seven-man crew from Grindline will spend four to five months working on the park. Pitcher's foundation is providing an apartment and equipment for the crew.

“I think people thought I was crazy. There were many doubters,” she said.

Pitcher hopes the park will become a place not just for fun, but for people to show their skills.

“There are so many talented, skilled skaters here, and they have nowhere to go,” she said.

The $600,000 park has been funded mostly through a grant from the Ken & Carol Schultz Foundation, an Arizona nonprofit run by Bridgeville native Ken Schultz. The Pitcher Park Foundation, formed by Pitcher to help further her skatepark dreams, raised the remaining 15 percent of the money.

Additional funds are being raised to build a spectator area.

Megan Guza is a staff writer for Trib Total Media. She can be reached at 412-380-5810 or mguza@tribweb.com.

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