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Newsmaker: Dr. Patricia George

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Dr. Patricia George is a UPMC pulmonologist and featured as a newsmaker because she’s captain of Team Phenomenal (cq) Hope, a women’s cycling team that will participate in a cross-country race next year. The group is trying to raise money for the nonprofit Pulmonary Hypertension Association.

'American Coyotes' Series

Traveling by Jeep, boat and foot, Tribune-Review investigative reporter Carl Prine and photojournalist Justin Merriman covered nearly 2,000 miles over two months along the border with Mexico to report on coyotes — the human traffickers who bring illegal immigrants into the United States. Most are Americans working for money and/or drugs. This series reports how their operations have a major impact on life for residents and the environment along the border — and beyond.

By Adam Smeltz
Saturday, Aug. 24, 2013, 12:01 a.m.
 

Noteworthy: George is the captain of Team PHenomenal Hope, a women's cycling team that will participate in the cross-country Ride Across America race in June 2014. The seven-member group is trying to raise $200,000 for the nonprofit Pulmonary Hypertension Association, which supports research into the rare ailment.

Age: 39

Residence: Swissvale

Family: Parents Tom and Beverly George of Chicago

Occupation: Assistant professor of medicine and a pulmonologist at UPMC, where she focuses on pulmonary hypertension and lung transplants. A blood-pressure condition, pulmonary hypertension affects fewer than 200,000 people in the U.S. and is often misdiagnosed.

Background: George arrived in Pittsburgh in 2004, when she joined UPMC as a fellow. She stayed on as a faculty member.

Education: George earned bachelor's degrees in biology and political science from Duke University in 1995 and a doctorate in medicine from Johns Hopkins University in 2001.

Quote: “It's important for medical professionals to know about pulmonary hypertension because we, as doctors, need at least to think about it when we diagnose a patient who presents with shortness of breath. If we don't think about it, we won't make the diagnosis.”

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