Share This Page

Hazelwood residents begin razing home for Carnegie Library branch

| Saturday, Sept. 21, 2013, 9:08 p.m.
Sidney Davis | Tribune-Review
Cheryl Harber of Hazelwood takes the first whacks at busting up a wall where a new community center will be constructed on Second Avenue in Hazelwood on Saturday September 21, 2013. Hazelwood residents, along with local community leaders and public officials, will are gathered for “Envisioning a Brighter Tomorrow,” a community celebration that will highlight plans to transform the vacant building at 5000 Second Ave. into a new library and community center.
Sidney Davis | Tribune-Review
Tim Smith, head of the Center of Life in Hazelwood, gathers children in attendance where a new community center will be constructed on Second Avenue in Hazelwood on Satrurday September 21, 2013. Hazelwood residents, along with local community leaders and public officials, will are gathered for “Envisioning a Brighter Tomorrow,” a community celebration that will highlight plans to transform the vacant building at 5000 Second Ave. into a new library and community center.
Sidney Davis | Tribune-Review
Dana Block, age 4 of Hazelwood, plays with Lego blocks while a meeting is taking place at the site of a proposed community center on Second Avenue in Hazelwood on Saturrday September 21, 2013. Hazelwood residents, along with local community leaders and public officials, will are gathered for “Envisioning a Brighter Tomorrow,” a community celebration that will highlight plans to transform the vacant building at 5000 Second Ave. into a new library and community center.

Wearing safety goggles and hard hats while wielding small sledgehammers, Auja Turner, 10, and her cousin Gemma Gilbert, 8, chipped away at a cement wall outside the former Hazelwood Presbyterian Church on Second Avenue.

John Terry, 14, took a few whacks at the wall, sending chunks of cement flying. So did the Rev. Tim Smith, executive director of Center of Life, an economic revitalization organization in the neighborhood.

“We are really making history today,” Smith said. “It has been such a long journey for our community.”

The demolition on Saturday of the cement wall served as a ground-breaking to start work on renovating the former church into a home for the Hazelwood branch of the Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh and other nonprofits. Rain moved the celebration into the basement of the building, but people braved the showers to tear down the wall.

“We have always recognized the need for knowledge,” said Homer Craig, 74, a longtime Hazelwood resident whom many refer to as the mayor of the neighborhood.

Craig noted the original Hazelwood library was the third established by Andrew Carnegie. The famed Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright August Wilson likely read every book in the original library, Craig joked.

Residents fought hard to keep the library, once scheduled to close. The branch's current home, on the second floor of a Second Avenue building it shares with a laundromat and deli, is “probably best described as cozy,” said Mary Frances Cooper, president and director of the Carnegie libraries.

Cheryl Harber was glad the community found a use for the vacant church at the corner of Second Avenue and Tecumseh Street. Built in the 1950s as an American Legion, it was later the church where her mother, the Rev. Louwanda Harris, preached.

“My mother is joyous,” Harber, 56, of Hazelwood said. “We don't have to tear it down and make it something else. It's here, and we're going to be able to use it, and it's going to be awesome.”

Doneia Averett, 10, and her sister Trinity, 9, go to the current library nearly every day. They use the computers, participate in after-school programs and even met a real penguin. The library, however, is too small, the sisters said.

ACTION-Housing, a Downtown nonprofit focused on providing affordable housing, bought the church for $220,000. The nonprofit hosted community meetings to determine how to use the building.

Using money from the Heinz Endowments, a grant from PNC and loans from the Urban Redevelopment Authority, the nonprofit plans to renovate the 14,000-square-foot building into a neighborhood center, with the library on the top floor and space for three nonprofits on the ground level.

Aaron Aupperlee is a staff writer for Trib Total Media. He can be reached at 412-320-7986 or aaupperlee@tribweb.com.

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.