TribLIVE

| News


 
Larger text Larger text Smaller text Smaller text | Order Photo Reprints

Test forms blamed for profile woes

Tuesday, Oct. 8, 2013, 12:01 a.m.
 

Educators and state officials agree Keystone Exams were the culprit in Friday's incomplete online release of the Department of Education's new school assessment system.

Thousands of students, proctors and administrators statewide failed to check the correct box that would indicate whether a student took the test for course credit or to meet federal requirements.

Acting Education Secretary Carolyn Dumaresq said the state shares the blame for those errors by failing to more clearly outline how to fill out test forms.

School Performance Profiles, the model approved to replace Adequate Yearly Progress goals mandated by No Child Left Behind, were delayed twice as state officials struggled to make corrections and verify basic, building-specific data. Pending those changes, more than 20 percent of the state's 3,000 schools requested that their data and test scores remain suppressed.

“Keystone was a problem, definitely, but they screwed up numbers as simple as how many kids we have in the building, too,” Plum Superintendent Timothy Glasspool said. “When we reported their errors, they told us our complaints were ‘unjustified.' They barely answer the phones as it is. They just didn't want to deal with us.”

Plum and more than 600 schools statewide chose to exclude data for their middle and high schools. Education Department spokesman Tim Eller reported last week that 1,444 other schools requested minor corrections.

“I estimate as many as 25 percent of our students were miscoded, and those are just the schools who saw their scores and decided to fight,” said Jim Buckheit, executive director of the Pennsylvania Association of School Administrators.

In development for more than three years, School Performance Profiles feature a score for every school — from zero to 100, or up to 107 with extra credit. Depending on grade level, Keystone Exams account for up to 90 percent of a school's profile score.

“I believe there are many more who saw positive overall scores and decided they don't want to rock the boat,” Buckheit said.

Pennsylvania introduced Keystone Exams two years ago for biology, Algebra I and literature as end-of-course exams rather than the generic 11th-grade test mandated under its former model, the Pennsylvania System of Student Assessment.

The Education Department originally vowed to phase in Keystones, but a budget crunch last year prompted state officials to replace the exams at once.

All high school juniors took the three Keystone tests, even those who had not completed the corresponding courses — many solely to fulfill “adequate yearly progress” requirements still in place prior to federal approval of the No Child Left Behind waiver request in September.

“So whether you were in trigonometry, geometry or intro to algebra, if you were a junior, you took the test,” Buckheit said. “With AYP gone, that shouldn't happen again, but since every student in the state has to take them before they graduate, it could.”

Nearly every high school and some middle schools in Western Pennsylvania excluded themselves from the website's debut. New data will be released in January, Dumaresq said, noting that future Keystone editions will feature more prominent instructions for which boxes to check.

Megan Guza, Pat Cloonan, Jodi Weigand and Mary Ann Thomas contributed to this report. Megan Harris is a staff writer for Trib Total Media. She can be reached at 412-388-5815 or mharris@tribweb.com.

Add Megan Harris to your Google+ circles.

Subscribe today! Click here for our subscription offers.

 

 

 
 


Show commenting policy

Most-Read Allegheny

  1. Allegheny County assistant public defender charged for allegedly lying to court staff
  2. Owner of Italian Village Pizza stores gets house arrest for tax evasion
  3. Pittsburgh cracks down on overcrowded houses
  4. Holocaust Center could be ready for move to Greenfield in June
  5. W.Va. natural gas line explodes near Ohio border
  6. Woman sought in ‘friendly fire’ fatal shooting in Brighton Heights
  7. Crews attempting to repair water main break in Brentwood
  8. Beaver Falls woman to trial on charges she stole police car while handcuffed
  9. Mt. Lebanon High School to sell its planetarium equipment
  10. Long-term solution for wastewater disposal eludes shale gas industry
  11. Project to End Human Trafficking volunteers help Uganda