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Photo Gallery: Last day of the Pittsburgh duck brings hundreds Downtown for last glimpse

| Sunday, Oct. 20, 2013, 11:56 p.m.
Jasmine Goldband | Tribune-Review
A large crowd gathers at the giant rubber duck as the sun sets at Point State Park, Downtown, Sunday, Oct. 20, 2013. The duck was going into storage Sunday night.
Jasmine Goldband | Tribune-Review
Bonnie Mahnick and her mother Debbie Mahnick of Beaver brought their dogs, a dalmatian named Daisy, a collie named Fury and a husky named Lucky, to Point State Park, Downtown, to take photos with the giant rubber duck Sunday, October 20, 2013. The duck was going in to storage Sunday night after spending about a month at the Point.
Jasmine Goldband | Tribune-Review
Grace Kearney, 11, of Mars takes turns with her sister Hannah, 13, posing for a photo while jumping in the air near the giant rubber duck while visiting with her family at Point State Park, Downtown, Sunday, October 20, 2013. The duck, a public art installation, was going into storage Sunday night.
Jasmine Goldband | Tribune-Review
A large crowd gathers to get a look and take photographs at the giant rubber duck at Point State Park, Downtown, Sunday, October 20, 2013. The duck was going into storage Sunday night.
Jasmine Goldband | Tribune-Review
A large crowd gathers to get a look and take photographs at the giant rubber duck at Point State Park, Downtown Sunday, October 20, 2013. The duck was going into storage Sunday night.
Jasmine Goldband | Tribune-Review
A kayaker paddles along the Allegheny River as a large crowd gathers across the River at Point State Park to look at the giant rubber duck Sunday, Oct. 20, 2013.
Jasmine Goldband | Tribune-Review
A large crowd gathers at the giant rubber duck as the sun sets at Point State Park, Downtown Sunday, October 20, 2013. The duck was going into storage Sunday night.

Hundreds of people gathered Sunday at Point State Park for one last opportunity to visit the giant rubber duck, a public art installation that floated on the Allegheny River for the past month.

Some lined up to snap pouty-face photos as others created their own unique twist on the duck self portrait. Some gestured hugs, others pointed. Everyone smiled. Strangers passed phones and other devices back and forth snapping photos and video of the duck as people unintentionally photo bombed each other in the huge crowd.

Claudia Osorno, 31, and Julio Perez, 32, of Downtown sat on the steps sharing ear buds as they Skyped with friends from Boston.

Tia Binion of McKees Rocks brought her sons Anthony Binion, 5, and Tyler Binion, 3, to pose for photographs together in their Mario Brothers Halloween costumes.

Many people brought dogs. Some posed with poodles dressed in Steelers jerseys. Bonnie Mahnick and her mother Debbie Mahnick brought their dalmatian Daisy, collie Fury and husky Lucky.

The Pittsburgh Cultural Trust planned to take down the duck late Sunday, clean it and store it.

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