Share This Page

East End Cooperative Ministry celebrates new home in East Liberty

| Wednesday, Oct. 23, 2013, 11:49 p.m.
Justin Merriman | Tribune-Review
Myrna Zelenitz (left), executive director of the East End Co-op Ministry, and Carla E. Frost, its vice-president, tour the group's new 56,000-square-foot facility in East Liberty on Wednesday, October 23, 2013.
Justin Merriman | Tribune-Review
The new 56,000 square foot East End Co-op Ministry facility in East Liberty on Wednesday, October 23, 2013.
Justin Merriman | Tribune-Review
The new 56,000 square foot East End Co-op Ministry facility in East Liberty on Wednesday, October 23, 2013.

East End Cooperative Ministry hopes its new home in East Liberty will help make its clients part of the neighborhood's resurgence.

“In the '60s, East Liberty was decimated as a vibrant commercial and residential area by the urban renewal thinking of the time,” said Phil Hallen, chairman of the fundraising campaign for East End Community House. “The project now brings a group of people who have been forgotten and neglected in the ensuing years ... back to the center of the now-vibrant housing and commercial boom of East Liberty.”

The ministry is celebrating the near completion of its 56,000-square-foot building on Penn Circle North with a pair of invitation-only events on Thursday.

“To have a state-of-the-art Community House is almost the crown jewel of all our development work,” said Skip Schwab, investment officer for East Liberty Development Inc.

Myrna Zelenitz, executive director of the ministry, said the building will increase the ministry's clients from 3,000 to 3,500 a year. More importantly, she added, is that staff will be able to serve them better.

The nonprofit offers a homeless shelter, food pantry, soup kitchen, Meals on Wheels, counseling, tutoring and recreation for children. Staff members say the move will bring together programs across 14 sites, mostly at East Liberty Presbyterian and Eastminster churches. The Community House will allow the agency to accept homeless women for the first time.

The Community House features a chapel and a Great Hall with a 48- by 24-foot mural designed by local artist Doug Cooper depicting Pittsburgh's past, present and future.

East End residents can use the facilities for weddings, receptions and other events and get help for finding and keeping a job. The Community House makes it more convenient for homeless clients to get therapy or take advantage of other programs, Pamela Jenkins said. She's a case manager at the ministry's PennFree program for clients trying to overcome addiction to drugs or alcohol.

Twenty years ago, Jenkins was addicted to crack cocaine and alcohol. She entered the ministry's program and was hired to help others in recovery.

“Just having folks believe in you when you don't believe in yourself is truly a godsend,” she said.

Bill Zlatos is a staff writer for Trib Total Media. He can be reached at 412-320-7828 or bzlatos@tribweb.com.

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.