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Newsmaker: Mark H. Kryder

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The Franklin Institute has named Carnegie Mellon University professor Mark H. Kryder a co-recipient of the 2014 Benjamin Franklin Medal in Electrical Engineering.

'American Coyotes' Series

Traveling by Jeep, boat and foot, Tribune-Review investigative reporter Carl Prine and photojournalist Justin Merriman covered nearly 2,000 miles over two months along the border with Mexico to report on coyotes — the human traffickers who bring illegal immigrants into the United States. Most are Americans working for money and/or drugs. This series reports how their operations have a major impact on life for residents and the environment along the border — and beyond.

Friday, Nov. 15, 2013, 12:01 a.m.
 

Noteworthy: The Philadelphia-based Franklin Institute has named Kryder a co-recipient of the 2014 Benjamin Franklin Medal in Electrical Engineering. The awards program recognizes individuals whose innovation has benefited humanity, advanced science, launched new fields of inquiry and deepened understanding of the universe.

Age: 70

Residence: Mt. Washington

Family: Wife, Sandra Kryder, and adult children Christa Hawkins and Matthew Kryder

Occupation: Professor of electrical and computer engineering at CMU

Background: Kryder joined CMU's faculty in 1978 and founded the university's Magnetics Technology and Data Storage Systems centers in 1983 and 1990, respectively. From 1998 to 2007, Kryder was senior vice president of research and chief technical officer at Seagate Technology's Downtown office. Upon retiring from Seagate in 2007, Kryder returned to CMU to continue research on heat-assisted magnetic recording. He has published more than 370 papers and holds 24 patents in the field of magnetic memory and storage technology.

Education: Bachelor of Science in electrical engineering from Stanford University in 1965; Master of Science in electrical engineering from California Institute of Technology in 1966; and a doctorate in electrical engineering and physics from California Institute of Technology in 1970.

Quote: “I am an electrical engineer but I'm also a physicist. I am interested in understanding natural phenomena … I long ago decided that science and engineering was very interesting and a lot of fun to do.”

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