TribLIVE

| News


 
Larger text Larger text Smaller text Smaller text | Order Photo Reprints

Illness briefly sidelines mayor, but he's back in the game by late week

Stephanie Strasburg | Tribune-Review
Pittsburgh Mayor Luke Ravenstahl speaks at the dedication ceremony for the new World War II Memorial on the North Shore on Friday, Dec. 6, 2013.

About The Tribune-Review
The Tribune-Review can be reached via e-mail or at 412-321-6460.
Contact Us | Video | Photo Reprints

By Bob Bauder and Chris Togneri

Published: Sunday, Dec. 8, 2013, 9:00 p.m.

The Tribune-Review is chronicling Mayor Luke Ravenstahl's service until his term ends in January.

Pittsburgh Mayor Luke Ravenstahl missed an AIDS awareness rally because of illness on Monday, but surfaced later in the week for a pension board meeting and a dedication ceremony.

Spokesman Marissa Doyle said the mayor was out of the office sick on Monday. She said she presumed, but wasn't sure, that he was sick on Tuesday.

Ravenstahl returned to work on Wednesday and was in the office attending to city business.

On Thursday, he attended a meeting of the Municipal Pension Trust Fund board, where he criticized Mayor-elect Bill Peduto's plan to offer 136 non-union employees early retirement, calling it a potential waste of taxpayers' money.

He said taxpayers, who could foot up to $2 million annually for 10 years, should not have to pay for early retirements.

“If you don't want these people here, fire them,” he said. “I have friends who will be angry at me for saying this, but I have an obligation to the taxpayers.”

On Friday, Ravenstahl spoke at the dedication ceremony of the Southwestern Pennsylvania World War II Memorial.

Although other invited speakers read from prepared statements, the mayor spoke casually but respectfully to a crowd that included more than 100 veterans wrapped in blankets on a cold, gray day.

“As a younger American,” he said, “I just want you to know that we are tremendously grateful for the sacrifices that you all have made and continue to make in order to make this a wonderful country for us to live in.”

He elicited laughs when he spoke of the “tenacity” shown by members of the memorial committee, particularly John Vento, a World War II veteran from Penn Hills, to make the monument a reality.

“On a personal note, I'm just excited that I don't have to take John Vento's call anymore — and I mean that with all due respect,” Ravenstahl joked.

The Mayor's Office initially announced he would appear on Saturday to dedicate a new soccer field at Riverview Park in the North Side. Doyle said Ravenstahl canceled so he could cheer on the North Catholic football team his father is coaching in the playoffs. The city canceled the event because of fears of bad weather.

As of the weekend, Pittsburgh residents have paid Ravenstahl about $101,800 this year. He makes $108,000 annually.

Did you see Ravenstahl recently?Send photos and details to wheresluke@tribweb.com.

Bob Bauder and Chris Togneri are Trib Total Media staff writers. Reach Bauder at 412-765-2312 or bbauder@tribweb.com. Reach Togneri at 412-380-5632 or ctogneri@tribweb.com

 

 
 


Show commenting policy

Most-Read Allegheny

  1. One dead, one wounded in shooting at Chartiers party
  2. Patients denied as donor organs discarded
  3. Pope Francis inspires incredible optimism
  4. Film tax credits bill would bump up state budget
  5. Castle Shannon man accused of crashing way down Pittsburgh street
  6. Bethel Park man to receive degree from Pitt he earned 64 years ago
  7. Newsmaker: Rosalind Ross
  8. Bullied South Fayette student’s case prompts wiretap overhaul legislation
  9. Legal experts question prosecuting South Fayette boy for recording bullies
  10. Man found fatally shot in Larimer a mile away from Homewood peace march
  11. South Fayette mother wants case against bullied son to be dropped
Subscribe today! Click here for our subscription offers.