TribLIVE

| News


 
Larger text Larger text Smaller text Smaller text | Order Photo Reprints

Carnegie Science Center MessFest allows kids to make a mess

About Adam Smeltz

By Adam Smeltz

Published: Wednesday, Jan. 1, 2014, 11:30 p.m.

New Year's Day might have found Sarah Bupp, 5, of Squirrel Hill relaxed at home, perched in front of the TV.

Instead, she splashed around in communal puddles of goop at the Carnegie Science Center, her hair and face streaked by midday with the evidence.

“At this age, they need to be hands-on playing and exploring to build brain pathways,” said Sarah's mother, Deb Alley, 47, one of 2,000 to 3,000 people expected on Wednesday at the science center's seventh annual MessFest. “The hands-on is critical.”

Organizers said that's the idea behind MessFest, developed by staff member Apryl Peroney as a New Year's Day prelude to spring cleaning. More than a half-dozen activities throughout the center encouraged youths to make their own chalk, play with slime and drop insulated eggs from aloft.

Peroney said the seven-hour program helps makes science accessible.

“There's science in everything. There's science in making the mess. There's science in cleaning it up,” said Peroney, the center's education coordinator for interactive exhibits.

Carlos Cruz, 35, of Monroeville took his three kids, who indulged in finger-painting and made “3D soap” that they can spread in their bathtub.

“So far, they have made a lot of mess. Thankfully, we brought a second set of clothes. It's just beautiful,” Cruz said. “They teach you how to do things so you can repeat it at home.”

For Tabetha Clayton, 10, of Moon, the biggest thrill came in designing a Styrofoam-and-plastic contraption to insulate an egg from a mammoth tumble.

“I learned that putting all that stuff in a bag doesn't really work,” Tabetha said. Her mother, Christina Clayton, 39, also got into the spirit, running her hands through a children's pool holding a corn-starch-and-water substance called Ooblek.

The goo, which has properties of a liquid and a solid, is called a non-Newtonian fluid because it won't follow Isaac Newton's law of viscosity.

“It feels kind of cold, it actually feels dry,” said Clayton, who said her family might otherwise spend New Year's Day at home.

For Susan Spencer, 35, of Emsworth the science center was “pretty much the only thing open” as she sought activities for her sons, Liam, 4, and Benjamin, 1.

“They've got to get out,” Spencer said as Benjamin wiped gunk from his hands. “Luckily for us, Pittsburgh is a pretty good place for kids.”

Adam Smeltz is a staff writer for Trib Total Media. He can be reached at 412-380-5676 or asmeltz@tribweb.com.

 

 

 
 


Show commenting policy

Most-Read Allegheny

  1. Population expansion in Western Pennsylvania hinges on immigrants
  2. Shale oil, gas drilling boom wins favor with labor unions, thwarting environmentalists
  3. Change in kidney allocation rules should help patients
  4. Catholic learning sessions to start in Pittsburgh
  5. Landslides put Baldwin firefighters in financial peril
  6. Officials identify Chartiers shooting victim as Wilkinsburg man
  7. Newsmaker: James Lange
  8. Moon school hiring under fire
  9. Obama hopes to replicate CCAC job training efforts across United States
  10. South Fayette parents express dissatisfaction with handling of bullying
  11. District attorney’s office takes paperwork from Wilkinsburg Middle School
Subscribe today! Click here for our subscription offers.