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Nonprofit group aims to spotlight only dairy in Pittsburgh, bring business to Carrick

| Monday, Jan. 13, 2014, 12:11 a.m.
Architects' renderings from the first phase of planning for a potential dairy district around the Colteryahn Dairy in Carrick. Planners will show renderings from a second phase on Tuesday, Jan. 14.
Architects' renderings from the first phase of planning for a potential dairy district around the Colteryahn Dairy in Carrick. Planners will show renderings from a second phase on Tuesday, Jan. 14.

Colteryahn Dairy in Carrick is the only remaining dairy in Pittsburgh — a fact not known to many, an economic development official said.

“It's easy to drive by without noticing,” said Kathleen Keating, a project manager at Economic Development South.

The nonprofit group is spearheading an effort to establish the Carrick Dairy District to spotlight the dairy on Brownsville Road and attract other businesses, such as ice cream and chocolate shops, that would complement the dairy.

At a community meeting on Tuesday, Economic Development South, which has been working with neighbors, business owners and city representatives on the plan for about a year, will show revised architectural renderings of the proposed dairy district and hear feedback about what people want to see in the district.

The dairy district's design concept could involve fiberglass cows and cohesive color schemes, such as the familiar black-and-white spotted pattern of a cow's coat, painted on buildings, Keating said.

The only businesses that are definite participants in the district are Colteryahn Dairy and 1613 Saloon.

Brownsville Road, where 22,000 cars travel daily, is a prime retail destination, said Stephanie Miller, manager of projects and initiatives for Economic Development South.

But problems prevent it from reaching its full potential, one business co-owner said.

Contending with the neighborhood's reputation for crime and neglect, 1613 Saloon's owners would have moved if not for the dairy district idea, said Danny Eggerton, 40, who bought the saloon with a now-former partner in 2004.

He runs it with his brother, Denny Eggerton, 42.

“We would have probably been out of here. The police presence needs to be bumped up,” Danny Eggerton said.

Colteryahn Dairy officials could not be reached.

Within the proposed district, Colteryahn owns five buildings. The Eggertons own two buildings, including a vacant one they bought in 2012 that they hope will house a restaurant. Colteryahn plans to build more office and storage space, which would free at least three of its buildings for new commercial tenants, Miller said.

Someone could rehabilitate spaces adjacent to the proposed district for retail businesses such as an antique shop or boutique. Two vacant lots in the area could be used for event space, such as a farmers market, and parking, she said.

Economic Development South received $75,000 in grants, including $50,000 through the Design Center of Pittsburgh and the city's Urban Redevelopment Authority, to study developing the district, Miller said. Some of the money went to hire Lawrenceville-based Desmone & Associates Architects for design work, she said.

If all goes as planned, development of the dairy district will start at the end of this year or early next year, Miller said.

Tory N. Parrish is a staff writer for Trib Total Media. She can be reached at 412-380-5662 or tparrish@tribweb.com.

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