TribLIVE

| News

 
Larger text Larger text Smaller text Smaller text | Order Photo Reprints

Newsmaker: M. Granger Morgan

Email Newsletters

Click here to sign up for one of our email newsletters.
Carnegie Mellon University Professor M. Granger Morgan, 72, of O'Hara will present a paper on how the challenges of climate change will require a fundamental restructuring of the world’s fragile energy systems on Feb. 16 at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in Chicago.

'American Coyotes' Series

Traveling by Jeep, boat and foot, Tribune-Review investigative reporter Carl Prine and photojournalist Justin Merriman covered nearly 2,000 miles over two months along the border with Mexico to report on coyotes — the human traffickers who bring illegal immigrants into the United States. Most are Americans working for money and/or drugs. This series reports how their operations have a major impact on life for residents and the environment along the border — and beyond.

Thursday, Feb. 6, 2014, 11:24 p.m.
 

M. Granger Morgan

Noteworthy: A Carnegie Mellon University professor, Morgan has been selected to present a paper on Feb. 16 at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in Chicago. The association is the world's largest general scientific society. His paper deals with how the challenges of climate change will require a fundamental restructuring of the world's fragile energy systems.

Age: 72

Residence: O'Hara

Family: Wife, Betty; adult children, Fritz and Kristi

Occupation: Morgan is head of CMU's Department of Engineering and Public Policy, co-director of the Wilton E. Scott Institute for Energy Innovation and co-director of the Electric Industry Center.

Background: Morgan's research covers problems in science, technology and public policy with a focus on energy, environmental systems, climate change and risk analysis. He has a bachelor's degree from Harvard University with a concentration in physics, a master's degree in astronomy and space science from Cornell University and a doctorate from the Department of Applied Physics and Information Sciences at the University of California at San Diego.

Quote: “In this talk, I'll summarize a wide range of the work we've been doing on how to use energy more efficiently, on developing new sources of energy, and on improving the security and reliability of our energy system.”

— Brian Bowling

Subscribe today! Click here for our subscription offers.

 

 

 


Show commenting policy

Most-Read Allegheny

  1. Peduto blasts Wolf’s plan to borrow $3B to shore up pensions
  2. Derry boy recovering at home after high-profile intestinal transplant
  3. Pittsburgh is planning to add network of bike lanes through Oakland
  4. School credit ratings a problem for several in Western Pennsylvania
  5. Central Catholic High School class celebrates 65 years of bond
  6. Amtrak still working to add bicycle racks to Western Pa. train routes
  7. Fugitive arrested at Plum motel on drug, gun charges
  8. W.Va. authorities charge 87 with drug trafficking
  9. Public Utility Commission will consider Yellow Cab fare hikes
  10. Newsmaker: Megan Cicconi
  11. Former Penn Hills football player found not guilty of homicide