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Pittsburgh groups celebrate Black History Month

| Sunday, Feb. 9, 2014, 11:43 p.m.

Senator John Heinz History Center exhibition — From Slavery to Freedom: Open daily 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., 1212 Smallman St., Strip District. heinzhistorycenter.org.

• Saturday speaker series: “The Paradox of American History — From Slavery to Freedom”: 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Feb. 15. History center's director of African-American programs, Samuel W. Black, will address the history of the abolition movement and slavery in Western Pennsylvania and how it affects today's opinions. Reservations to Sandra Baker at 412-454-6412 or slbaker@heinzhistorycenter.org.

• Healthy Heritage cooking series: 1 p.m. Feb. 15. Elise “The Diva Chef” Wims will share traditional black recipes in the museum's Weisbrod Kitchen Classroom. Admission: $20; seating limited; reservations required to Sarah Rooney, 412-454-6373 or serooney@heinzhistorycenter.org.

• From Slavery to Freedom film series: “The Rise and Fall of Jim Crow”: 5:30 p.m. Feb. 26, Homewood Library Auditorium, 7101 Hamilton Ave. Discussion following screening. Free.

Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh: carnegielibrary.org/bhm

• Sunday afternoon music series:Pittsburgh Gospel Choir: 2 p.m. Sunday, CLP Main, First Floor Quiet Reading Room, 4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland. American gospel performed.

• Poetic strings: 2-4 p.m. Feb. 16, CLP Squirrel Hill, 5801 Forbes Ave. Members of Squirrel Hill Writers' Studio will read their poems, written about musicians who have influenced their lives and what Black History Month means to them.

• African-American film series: “Rocksteady — The Roots of Reggae”: 5:30 p.m. Feb. 18, CLP Homewood, 7101 Hamilton Ave. Story of the golden age of Jamaican music.

• “I've got rhythm — A musical celebration of African-American musicians and writers”: 6 p.m. Feb. 19, CLP Homewood, 7101 Hamilton Ave. Families are invited to participate in this interactive storytime.

• Meet the filmmakers — Game Changers Project: 2:30 p.m. Feb. 22, CLP Downtown & Business, 612 Smithfield St. Four local filmmakers will screen their documentary projects, then present a panel discussion.

• World kaleidoscope — Soldiers and Sailors United States Colored Troops Drum Corps: 2 p.m. Feb. 23, CLP Main, First Floor Quiet Reading Room, 4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland. Re-enactment honors black soldiers in the Civil War. Performance will include an overview of the history of the war, with an emphasis on the deeds and sacrifices of blacks.

• Let's make musical instruments: 6 p.m. Feb. 24, CLP Hill District, 2177 Centre Ave. Using boxes, rubber bands and towel rolls, attendees will make instruments, then perform Billy Strayhorn's “Take the ‘A' Train.”

• UMOJA African Arts Company African dance and drum performance: 5 p.m. Feb. 25, CLP Knoxville, 400 Brownsville Road. Performance suitable for all ages.

• Citiparks: Monthlong exhibit celebrating Black History Month. “Beyond the Funny Pages — The works of art and life captured in comics” will feature artwork, photographs and memorabilia to showcase three artists with ties to Pennsylvania; opening reception, 6-8 p.m. Monday, City-County Building lobby, 414 Grant St., Downtown.

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