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Brighton Heights man accused of decapitating mother's Chihuahua

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Thursday, Feb. 13, 2014, 12:09 a.m.
 

A Brighton Heights man who told police, “The devil did it,” was charged with cruelty to animals Wednesday after he was accused of using a machete to decapitate his mother's pet Chihuahua.

Matthew Ondo, 30, whose jeans, shirt and shoes were splattered with blood, first denied killing the 14-month-old teacup Chihuahua named “Izzy,” before telling officers, “the devil did it. Allah did it,” a criminal complaint states.

Police were called at 6:15 p.m. to the family's home on Brighton Road where Ondo's parents led them to the backyard where they found the decapitated remains along with a bloody machete and butcher knife, the complaint states.

Ondo's parents told police their son is an unemployed drug addict who has emotional problems, the complaint states.

His mother told police she was in her second-floor bedroom with Izzy when she heard her son in the living room calling the dog. She said Izzy ran downstairs and that she thought nothing more about it until her husband came home and started yelling.

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