TribLIVE

| News

 
Larger text Larger text Smaller text Smaller text | Order Photo Reprints

Pittsburgh workers to retire early after accepting city offer

Andrew Russell | Tribune-Review - Carol Veitch of Brookline wipes away a tear while listening to members of Pittsburgh City Council say their goodbyes to a group of non-union workers who were offered early retirement by Mayor Bill Peduto at the City County Building, Thursday. Veitch, who worked in the city's finance office for 38 years, was among the 176 retirees.
<div style='float:right;width:100%;' align='right'><em>Andrew Russell  |  Tribune-Review</em></div>Carol Veitch of Brookline wipes away a tear while listening to members of Pittsburgh City Council say their goodbyes to a group of non-union workers who were offered early retirement by Mayor Bill Peduto at the City County Building, Thursday. Veitch, who worked in the city's finance office for 38 years, was among the 176 retirees.
Andrew Russell | Tribune-Review - Cindy Southworth, of Knoxville, center, says goodbye to Dana Robinson of Manchester and who works in the Pittsburgh's Innovation and Performance department after a goodbye party for a group of non-union workers who were offered early retirement by Mayor Bill Peduto at the City County Building, Thursday. Southworth, who worked in the city's finance office for 17 years, was among the 176 retirees.
<div style='float:right;width:100%;' align='right'><em>Andrew Russell  |  Tribune-Review</em></div>Cindy Southworth, of Knoxville, center, says goodbye to Dana Robinson of Manchester and who works in the Pittsburgh's Innovation and Performance department after a goodbye party for a group of non-union workers who were offered early retirement by Mayor Bill Peduto at the City County Building, Thursday. Southworth, who worked in the city's finance office for 17 years, was among the 176 retirees.
Andrew Russell | Tribune-Review - Linda Johnson Wasler of Highland Park says goodbye to Mayor Bill Peduto during a goodbye party for a group of non-union workers who were offered early retirement by Peduto at the City County Building, Thursday. Johnson Wasler, who worked in the city clerks office for 35 years, was among the 176 retirees.
<div style='float:right;width:100%;' align='right'><em>Andrew Russell  |  Tribune-Review</em></div>Linda Johnson Wasler of Highland Park says goodbye to Mayor Bill Peduto during a goodbye party for a group of non-union workers who were offered early retirement by Peduto at the City County Building, Thursday. Johnson Wasler, who worked in the city clerks office for 35 years, was among the 176 retirees.

Email Newsletters

Click here to sign up for one of our email newsletters.

'American Coyotes' Series

Traveling by Jeep, boat and foot, Tribune-Review investigative reporter Carl Prine and photojournalist Justin Merriman covered nearly 2,000 miles over two months along the border with Mexico to report on coyotes — the human traffickers who bring illegal immigrants into the United States. Most are Americans working for money and/or drugs. This series reports how their operations have a major impact on life for residents and the environment along the border — and beyond.

Thursday, March 13, 2014, 11:51 p.m.
 

Carol Veitch was looking to make some quick money between school semesters when she took a temporary job in 1975 as a data entry clerk in the city of Pittsburgh's fledgling computer department.

She's still on the job 38 years later, but won't be for long. Veitch, 60, of Brookline is among more than 60 people who have accepted an early retirement offer from Mayor Bill Peduto. Her last day is Friday.

“I came here on a break from nursing school and never went back,” said Veitch, who attended a reception on Thursday in City Hall for retiring workers. “I had no intention of leaving for another three or four years, but the offer was too good.”

Friday is the deadline for nonunion employees, whose age and years of service equal 70 or more, to sign up for the buyout. Employees who retire early will receive one year's salary plus their pension. Roughly 176 qualify, and the Peduto administration estimates that the plan will cost the city about $8.8 million if all take it.

Peduto attended the reception and wished the workers well.

“There's a lot of institutional knowledge walking out the door,” said Cindy Southworth, 64, of Knoxville, an internal auditor for the Finance Department.

Southworth, who has worked for the city for 17 years, said to her knowledge she is one of the least veteran employees taking the offer.

Others had more than 44 years with the city.

Jane Conner, 60, of Banksville, supervisor of records management in the Finance Department, said she was planning to retire next year with 33 years of service before accepting Peduto's offer.

“This opportunity was open and it was too good to pass up,” she said.

Bob Bauder is a staff writer for Trib Total Media. He can be reached at 412-765-2312 or bbauder@tribweb.com.

Subscribe today! Click here for our subscription offers.

 

 

 


Show commenting policy

Most-Read Allegheny

  1. Judge adds 2 years to sentence of Baldwin Borough man acquitted of murder
  2. School credit ratings a problem for several in Western Pennsylvania
  3. Thief’s attorney blames Rivers Casino; judge isn’t swayed
  4. Fugitive arrested at Plum motel on drug, gun charges
  5. Projects advance through Pittsburgh planning commission despite opposition
  6. Boy Scouts’ end to ban on gay leaders unnerves religious groups
  7. Man shot several times in Allentown neighborhood
  8. 2 firefighters injured in Millvale house fire
  9. Newsmaker: Megan Cicconi
  10. Rising East Liberty out of reach for Pittsburgh’s poor
  11. ‘Turf battle’ blamed in fights that canceled Carrick church festival