Share This Page

Students to take Point State Park project to 'heART'

| Tuesday, March 18, 2014, 11:06 p.m.

A public art project, courtesy of American Eagle Outfitters and the Student Conservation Association, will get under way at Point State Park next month, and this time, it's not a giant inflatable duck.

The partnership's Alternative Spring Break program will make a mural on a parking lot wall south of the Point as part of an annual service project.

Kevin Hamilton, vice president for communications from the Student Conservation Association, said past spring break projects focused on threatened wilderness areas. This year's program, “heART This City” shifts focus to urban areas with plants and trees, with four art projects in parks nationwide.

“We're trying to engage young people right in their own communities, to get them outdoors,” he said, “to get to re-energize some of these parks in their own neighborhoods.”

Ed Trask, an urban artist with a reputation for symbolic portraits dealing with preservation, history and spirituality, will probably begin painting the mural a week before the April 26 event, Hamilton said. On that day, as he finishes his work, student and community volunteers and American Eagle employees will clean the space and do some gardening.

Officials from the park and state Department of Conservation and Natural Resources were not available for comment.

The three other public art projects are at Golden Gate Park in San Francisco, Jean Lafitte National Battlefield in New Orleans and Piotrowski Park and Our Lady of Tepeyac School in Chicago.

This is the seventh annual partnership between American Eagle and the Student Conservation Association.

Melissa Daniels is a staff writer for Trib Total Media. She can be reached at 412-380-8511 or mdaniels@tribweb.com.

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.