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Newsmaker: Tom Walker

| Tuesday, April 1, 2014, 11:24 p.m.
Tom Walker, the adult honoree of Pittsburgh’s Walk to Cure Arthritis.

Noteworthy: The Arthritis Foundation, Great Lakes Region, has named Tom Walker as its adult honoree for Pittsburgh's Walk to Cure Arthritis at 8 a.m. May 31 at SouthSide Works. He was commended for not letting arthritis overcome his life. The other honorees are Sally Wiggin, Rylee Laya and Nathan McCullough.

Age: 65

Residence: Gibsonia

Family: Wife, Carolyn; sons, Matthew, Sean and Neil; and daughter, Carrie Kelly

Background: Walker pitched for the Montreal Expos, Detroit Tigers, St. Louis Cardinals and Los Angeles Dodgers off and on from 1972-78. His son is Pirates' second baseman Neil Walker. After arthritis ended his baseball career, he went into sales at a hospital supplies company in Indiana and retired from a hospital furniture company based in Wisconsin. In addition to osteoarthritis, he has suffered a stroke to each eye. Despite replacements of both hips and his right knee, he attends physical therapy three times a week and regularly sees his rheumatologist.

Education: Bachelor's degree in education from the University of Tampa

Quote: “The best thing you can do with arthritis is be active. It might hurt a little bit, but you got to move. It's the proper therapy.”

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