TribLIVE

| News


 
Larger text Larger text Smaller text Smaller text | Order Photo Reprints

Landmark former school in Pittsburgh's Hill District to incubate startups

Tuesday, April 22, 2014, 11:09 p.m.
 

A Pittsburgh nonprofit plans to use a landmark former school in the Hill District to nurture small, start-up businesses in Pittsburgh's economically depressed neighborhoods.

Christian Evangelistic Economic Development, a Larimer faith-based organization that helps new businesses, will spend $10 million renovating the old Miller Elementary School, Executive Director Rufus Idris said.

“We do a lot of work with immigrants and refugees who come here with business ideas and are willing to stay,” Idris said. “By the time they leave this space they're strong enough to compete.”

He said the organization has $150,000 to complete design and other work necessary before construction can start. It is seeking federal grants and foundation support to have the building open by 2016.

William J. Gatti Jr., president of Trek Development Group, Downtown, said his company donated the building to the nonprofit because it liked the concept.

Trek purchased the school in 2011 from the Pittsburgh Public Schools for $110,000, according to Allegheny County tax records.

It paid $44,877 in a separate 2012 transaction to buy the school auditorium, which it has since turned into eight apartments. All are rented, Gatti said.

“We want their mission to work and we want a good use for that building,” Gatti said.

Pittsburgh Councilman R. Daniel Lavelle said the project would increase business opportunities in the Hill and preserve a signature neighborhood building.

Built in 1906 — the gym and auditorium were added in 1939 — the school was one of the first in Pittsburgh to educate black children. Pittsburgh Public Schools closed Miller in a cost-cutting move after the 2005-06 school year. The school's curriculum during its final years focused on African culture.

“It holds a great significance for many who live in the Lower Hill,” Lavelle said. “When it closed the last thing the community wanted was to see it become an abandoned building.”

Plans call for a mix of office, community and light manufacturing space, which businesses can rent for up to two years at market rates. Anyone can apply, but the nonprofit will give priority to minorities and clients who qualify for rent subsidies, Idris said. The organization will offer loans to be used as start-up capital when businesses leave.

The nonprofit plans a large day-care center for the basement, commercial kitchen, fabric shop, laboratory for manufacturing cosmetics and body care products, and space where immigrant groups can hold social functions.

Carl Redwood, co-director of the Hill District Consensus Group, said residents are supportive.

“It would be advantageous to the community in many ways,” he said.

Bob Bauder is a staff writer for Trib Total Media. He can be reached at 412-765-2312 or bbauder@tribweb.com.

 

 

 
 


Show commenting policy

Most-Read Allegheny

  1. $4M floor project at Pittsburgh International Airport to replace drab gray, clickety-clack tile
  2. Vending business sold after pot-growing operation found in Lawrenceville
  3. Sri Shirdi Sai Baba Temple in Monroeville plans expansion
  4. Pittsburgh, Allegheny County completing 911 center merger
  5. Feds dispute ex-PA Cyber chief’s claims of illegal attorney-client recordings
  6. Roman Catholics, evangelical Christians closer now than ever
  7. Icy water, donations to fight ALS flow with social media’s help
  8. Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra makes ‘great strides’ financially, audit shows
  9. Barred Mt. Oliver firefighter turns up in gear at blaze, spurs investigation
  10. Weekend traffic jam session expected on Pittsburgh’s roadways
  11. Officers involved in shootings relay physical, emotional toll of incidents
Subscribe today! Click here for our subscription offers.