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Carnegie Mellon alum DeRoy shares in 'best musical' Tony Award

| Monday, June 9, 2014, 12:01 a.m.
Getty Images for Tony Awards Productions
CMU grads Matt Bomer and Zachary Quinto speak onstage during the 68th Annual Tony Awards at Radio City Music Hall on June 8, 2014 in New York City.
Getty Images for Tony Awards Productions
Jamie deRoy, who attended Carnegie Mellon, attends the 68th Annual Tony Awards at Radio City Music Hall on June 8, 2014 in New York City.
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Sutton Foster, who attended Carnegie Mellon, performs with the cast of 'Violet' during the American Theatre Wing's 68th annual Tony Awards at Radio City Music Hall in New York, June 8, 2014.
Getty Images for Tony Awards Productions
Karen Ziemba, Billy Porter and Zachary Quinto attend the 68th Annual Tony Awards at Radio City Music Hall on June 8, 2014 in New York City.

A Carnegie Mellon University grad scored top honors for work on a Broadway musical at the 2014 Tony Awards.

Jamie DeRoy (Class of 1967) was producer on “A Gentleman's Guide to Love and Murder,” which won for best musical.

Five other nominated CMU grads didn't fare as well during Sunday's award presentation.

Sutton Foster (attended CMU 1993-94), nominated for best lead actress in a musical for “Violet,” lost to Jess Mueller of “Beautiful — The Carole King Musical.”

Darko Tresnjak took home the best director award for “Gentleman's Guide,” beating out Leigh Silverman (CMU Class of 1996) for “Violet.”

Paula Wagner (1969) was producer for best play nominee “Mothers and Sons.” The award went to “All the Way.”

The award for best lead actress in a play went to Audra McDonald in “Lady Day at Emerson's Bar & Grill.” Cherry Jones (CMU Class of 1978) was nominated for her performance in “The Glass Menagerie.”

Peter Hylenski (1997) was nominated for best sound design of a musical for “After Midnight.” The winner, announced prior to the Broadcast, was Brian Ronan for “Beautiful – The Carole King Musical.”

Also during the broadcast, CMU alumni Zachary Quinto and Matt Bomer announced the creation of the Tony Honor for Excellence in Theatre Education, a collaboration between CMU and the Tony Awards and the first national recognition program to honor kindergarten through high school theater educators. Nominations for theater educators will be accepted online this fall, and the first recipient will be honored on stage at the 2015 Tony Awards.

The two stars who followed Quinto and Bomer as presenters — Judith Light and Patrick Wilson — also are CMU grads.

CMU also released its first network, prime-time television commercial during the Tony presentations. The animated spot highlights the university's success in the arts, business, science and technology.

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