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Duquesne Light offers LED streetlights

Saturday, July 12, 2014, 12:01 a.m.
 

Bright white, energy-efficient streetlights are popping up in Alle­gheny and Beaver counties.

Duquesne Light's LED pilot program that swaps traditional high-pressure sodium lamps for the more efficient light-emitting diode lamps kicked off last week, when the utility replaced 20 streetlights in two municipalities, spokesman Brian Knavish said.

“We're really excited to get this started, and we hope it will continue to grow,” said Knavish, who would not identify the towns.

Municipalities can apply to take part in the program through July 22, Knavish said. Duquesne Light extended the deadline, which was originally on Monday, to offer more towns the chance to participate, he said. Duquesne Light would switch a minimum of 10 consecutive streetlights to LED lamps, but towns may be granted more based on availability.

The next LED light installation is scheduled in Dormont on Wednesday, Knavish said.

The company plans to make this an annual program. It can switch 1,500 streetlights a year to LED, based on a state tariff issued in April by the Public Utility Commission.

“I do like the idea of LED being energy-efficient, cost-efficient,” said Sewickley Manager Kevin Flannery, whose town was granted 10 LED streetlights and has asked to swap 30 more, if available.

So far, 18 municipalities have applied for the program and “it's very likely” that most will be accepted, Knavish said. Municipalities will be required to pay $109 per light for their removal.

There are 57,000 Duquesne Light-owned streetlights in the utility's service area, which includes most of Allegheny and Beaver counties, excluding Pittsburgh.

Baldwin Borough leaders pushed the company to provide LED lights as an option for several years, saying they provide a cleaner look and could save the borough money, Manager John Barrett told council members on Tuesday.

“It's a great next step,” Barrett said of the pilot program.

Baldwin removed more than 360 of its 1,350 streetlights in 2012, saving about $66,000 a year on a $250,000 bill, he said.

Brentwood in 2009 switched all of its borough-owned decorative lights along Brownsville Road to LED and added motion sensors to lighting in borough offices. It added energy-efficient heating and cooling equipment at its Civic Center that has saved $20,000 annually, Manager George Zboyovsky said.

He couldn't tell the difference in the lighting the LED lamps provide.

Stephanie Hacke is a staff writer for Trib Total Media. She can be reached at 412-388-5818 or shacke@tribweb.com.

 

 

 
 


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