Share This Page

Emsworth officials, Holy Family Institute meet on plan to host immigrant children

| Wednesday, July 16, 2014, 10:57 p.m.

Holy Family Institute and Emsworth Borough officials met for the first time on Wednesday to discuss the Catholic nonprofit's plans to provide temporary shelter to children who illegally entered the United States without parents or guardians, officials said.

“I've been OK with what I've heard so far. But I represent the people of Emsworth, and a lot of them have some major concerns. These will need to be addressed,” Mayor Dee Quinn said.

Quinn and Holy Family's CEO, Sister Linda Yankoski, said a public meeting is scheduled for 7 p.m. July 29 in the Emsworth borough building at 171 Center Ave. A presentation on the plans will be followed by a question-and-answer session, Quinn said.

“We want to allay their concerns,” Yankoski said.

The Tribune-Review reported on Tuesday on Holy Family's plans to take in 20 children as old as 12 and ultimately as many as 36 — a prospect that concerned some residents. Quinn said then she was “stunned” to learn of the plans, noting Holy Family had not notified the borough.

Nearly 60,000 unaccompanied children, most from Central America, have flooded the United States since October, straining the federal Unaccompanied Alien Children program, which has 100 permanent shelters. Efforts to find room in temporary locations elsewhere have generated protests and complaints.

It remains unknown when Holy Family might accept children. It needs to hire several people who can speak Spanish to work with the children, including a clinician, case manager and youth counselors.

Tom Fontaine is a staff writer for Trib Total Media.

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.