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Among contract demands for police: less overtime, residences in city

Kristina Serafini | Trib Total Media
Pittsburgh Police officers on the scene of an apparent shooting at The Capital Grille in Downtown Pittsburgh Friday, April 5, 2013.

By Margaret Harding
Monday, Aug. 11, 2014, 10:30 p.m.
 

Pittsburgh officials want city police officers to reduce overtime, pass physical fitness exams and continue living in the city, according to contract proposals the Tribune-Review obtained.

Tim McNulty, spokesman for Mayor Bill Peduto, would not comment on Monday on the 25-point proposal that seeks to change officers' duty locations based on performance, cut two paid holidays and task supervisors from other agencies with determining promotions.

City Council authorized Peduto to pay as much as $100,000 to Downtown labor law firm Campbell Durrant Beatty Palombo & Miller for collective bargaining and arbitration legal services.

In contrast, the Fraternal Order of Police's contract proposals to the city included an annual 5 percent salary bonus for residing in Pittsburgh, unspecified wage increases, two additional paid holidays — Easter and Heroes Day on Sept. 11 — and a requirement to offer police union members the same economic benefits as city firefighters, who bargain separately.

FOP Fort Pitt Lodge No. 1 President Howard McQuillan declined comment. FOP attorney Bryan Campbell, who plans to be one of three arbitrators, said he hasn't read the plans and could not comment.

Richard Poulson, an FOP attorney who works on contract issues, declined to comment.

An Allegheny County judge agreed with an arbitration panel's decision to allow Pittsburgh police officers to live outside the city's boundaries if they stay within 25 air miles of Downtown. The city is appealing that ruling.

Other changes to the city's proposed contract include the right to make an outside employment policy that would require officers to seek approval every year from the police chief to perform outside work.

Former police Chief Nate Harper, who is serving a federal prison sentence for conspiracy to commit theft and failing to file taxes, had formed a security consulting firm with fellow employees, including subordinates, that then-Mayor Luke Ravenstahl criticized.

Margaret Harding is a Trib Total Media staff writer. Reach her at 412-380-8519 or mharding@tribweb.com.

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