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Pitt Dance Marathon raises $153K for Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh Foundation

| Sunday, Feb. 22, 2015, 9:00 p.m.
University of Pittsburgh students dance at the Pitt Dance Marathon, a 24-hour fundraiser that benefits Childrens Hospital of Pittsburgh, at the Cost Sports Center in Oakland on Feb. 21, 2015. Some 560 participants took part in the event, hoping to raise $100,000.
Justin Merriman | Trib Total Media
University of Pittsburgh students dance at the Pitt Dance Marathon, a 24-hour fundraiser that benefits Childrens Hospital of Pittsburgh, at the Cost Sports Center in Oakland on Feb. 21, 2015. Some 560 participants took part in the event, hoping to raise $100,000.
University of Pittsburgh student Rachel Tuschak, 18,  dances at the Pitt Dance Marathon, a 24-hour fundraiser that benefits Childrens Hospital of Pittsburgh, at the Cost Sports Center in Oakland on Feb. 21, 2015. Some 560 participants took part in the event, hoping to raise $100,000.
Justin Merriman | Trib Total Media
University of Pittsburgh student Rachel Tuschak, 18, dances at the Pitt Dance Marathon, a 24-hour fundraiser that benefits Childrens Hospital of Pittsburgh, at the Cost Sports Center in Oakland on Feb. 21, 2015. Some 560 participants took part in the event, hoping to raise $100,000.

University of Pittsburgh students danced their way to a record amount of fundraising during the weekend.

The 10th annual Pitt Dance Marathon raised $153,067.99 to benefit Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh patients who are fighting cancer, Pitt spokesman Shawn Ahearn said. The amount exceeded the fundraising goal, $100,000, and was nearly double the amount raised for the 2014's marathon beneficiary, the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation.

Organized by the Office of Fraternity and Sorority Life, which is a part of the Division of Student Affairs, the Pitt Dance Marathon drew 2,000 student dancers and spectators to the Charles L. Cost Sports Center at various times from noon Saturday to noon Sunday, Ahearn said.

Every year or couple of years, Pitt students choose a different marathon beneficiary based on requests for proposals solicited from local charities, Ahearn said.

“This is the first year that they are supporting Children's Hospital,” he said.

The Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh Foundation was excited to apply to become a dance marathon beneficiary, said Molly Vogel, development coordinator for the hospital's foundation, in a prepared statement.

“Then, when we were chosen, we didn't know what to expect, but this has exceeded anything we could have hoped for,” she said.

The Pitt Dance Marathon is a yearlong fundraising effort that culminates in a 24-hour dance marathon. Since 2005, the marathon has raised about $1.02 million for Pittsburgh charities.

In its 10th anniversary year, the Pitt Dance Marathon has partnered with the Children's Miracle Network to raise $300,000 for the Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh.

Children's Hospital is a member of Children's Miracle Network, which supports the needs of children's hospitals nationwide.

The money raised during this year's Pitt Dance Marathon is the first step toward meeting that $300,000 pledge, said Ahearn, who said other fundraising events are planned.

Tory N. Parrish is a staff writer for Trib Total Media. She can be reached at 412-380-5662 or tparrish@tribweb.com.

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