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Randy Houser to close Dayton Fair

| Saturday, Aug. 17, 2013, 12:51 a.m.
Randy Houser, country chart-topper, plays the Dayton Fair tonight.

One of country music's brightest stars will help close the Dayton Fair this evening.

Randy Houser, a chart-topping country musician, will perform at 8 p.m. in the fair's grandstand, followed by a fireworks display.

Houser, 37, first came onto the country music scene in 2008, when he released his debut album, “Anything Goes.” Its first single, “Anything Goes,” hit number 16 on the Billboard Hot Country chart, and the follow-up single, “Boots On,” reached number two.

Two years later, Houser released his second album, “They Call Me Cadillac,” which peaked at number 8 on Bilboard's Top Country Albums chart.

Despite his previous successes, 2013 has proved to be a banner year for Houser, who is touring in support of his third album, “How Country Feels.”

The album boasts the hit singles “How Country Feels” and “Runnin' Out of Moonlight,” which both reached No. 1 on the Billboard Country Airplay chart.

Larry Marshall, president of the Dayton Fair board, said organizers booked Houser in December. Their goal is to bring in young country music acts at the beginning of their careers, in hopes of attracting younger crowds.

The fair has a record of attracting acts early in their careers, including Travis Tritt, Billy Ray Cyrus, Josh Gracin and Lone Star, along with veterans, such as Confederate Railroad, the Oak Ridge Boys, Charlie Daniels, Joe Diffie and Aaron Tippin.

“We're always going for acts that might make it big, but it doesn't always turn out,” Marshall said. “One year the board turned down Faith Hill.

“Another year, they turned down Garth Brooks, because they didn't think he could sing that well.”

The fair does not sell tickets for its shows — instead, admission to the concert is part of the $7 ticket to get into the fair, Marshall said.

Marshall expects the show to fill the fair's 3,500-seat grandstand, and the race track in front of the stage. He was unsure how many people could fit on the track, but Marshall said he expects it to be standing-room only.

Brad Pedersen is a staff writer for Trib Total Media. He can be reached at 724-543-1303, ext. 1337, or bpedersen@tribweb.com.

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