TribLIVE

| News


 
Larger text Larger text Smaller text Smaller text | Order Photo Reprints

Weight restrictions placed on 14 Armstrong bridges to comply with state regulations

Louis B. Ruediger | Leader Times
PennDOT officials Joseph Dubovi and James Andrews survey a bridge crossing Little Brush Creek along Route 56 in Brush Valley Township, Indiana County. Thursday September 19, 2013

On the list

PennDOT officials plan to restrict weight limits on 13 structurally-deficient bridges across Armstrong County.

Each of the of the roads are owned by the state, and include:

• Route 66, over Guffy Run, in Parks Township

• Upper Mateer Road, over Carnahan Run, in Parks Township

• Route 839, over Glade Run, in Cowanshannock Township

• Route 1039, over a tributary of the south fork of Pine Creek, in Cowanshannock Township

• Route 2003, over Huskins Run, in Cowanshannock Township

• Route 2003, over Cessna Run, in Plumcreek Township

• Cherry Run Road, over Cherry Run, in Plumcreek Township

• Edyville Road, over Pine Run, in Redbank Township

• Route 1037, over the south fork of Pine Creek, in Wayne Township

• Cherry Run Road, over a tributary to Cherry Run, in Burrell Township

• Jackson Road, over Rattling Run, in Kiskiminetas Townsip

• Pony Farm Road, over Glade Run, in North Buffalo Township

• Seybertown Road, over Sugar Creek, in Brady's Bend Township

• Lemmon Hollow Road, over Glade Run, in East Franklin Township

Friday, Sept. 20, 2013, 12:01 a.m.
 

PennDOT officials plan to place weight restrictions on approximately 1,000 bridges across Pennsylvania because of structural deficiencies, including 14 in Armstrong County.

In PennDOT's District 10, which includes Armstrong, Indiana, Jefferson, Clarion and Butler counties, officials plan to place immediate weight restrictions on 50 bridges.

Each bridge's weight limit is lowered to 80 percent of its legal limit, according to Joseph Dubovi, executive of District 10.

Eight of Armstrong County's 14 structurally deficient bridges reduced weight limits are being posted for the first time, while six have already had their weight limits reduced once and are facing further weight limit reductions, according to a PennDOT report.

For example, officials plan to reduce the weight limit from 14 tons to 12 tons on the Eddyville Road Bridge, over Pine Run, in Redbank, while the Route 66 bridge over Guffy Run in Parks Township, faces a 26-ton weight limit restriction for the first time.

“The number of bridges in Armstrong County is about average for at-risk bridges,” Dubovi said.

The average car and passenger truck ranges from 1.5 to three tons, while a loaded school bus and charter bus range from 17 to 20 tons, according to a PennDOT report. Larger vehicles, including a loaded coal truck, typically weigh 36 tons, while a loaded tractor trailer weighs 40 tons.

Dubovi said state officials inspect bridges every two years to determine their condition and safety rating.

“There will be more bridges on the weight limit reduction list as our inspectors continue to go out and as our bridges get older,” Dubovi said. “The average age of bridges in Pennsylvania is 51 years, but in District 10, the average age is 56 years.”

During the inspection, officials rank the condition of load-bearing beams, known as the super structure, the bridge piers and abutments and the surface on a scale of zero to nine. Whenever any portion of the bridge structure receives a ranking of four or below, it is labeled structurally deficient, Dubovi said.

Whenever the bridge piers and abutments, or the superstructure, receive a ranking of four, officials reduce the weight limits on the bridge, he added.

“We want to determine if it can still carry loads that are less than their maximum weight limits,” Dubovi said. “We hope to extend the life of these bridges by reducing the load it carries.”

Some of the bridges could carry their weight limits indefinitely, depending on their location and the amount of traffic.

PennDOT officials plan to focus on interstates first, then state routes, such as Route 22, Route28 and Route 66, Dubovi said.

They plan to focus on secondary and local bridges last, he said.

“Federal funding is tightening up, and right now, we don't have enough state funds to address the structures we have that are considered bad,” Dubovi said. “Some of the bridges on smaller roads' weight limits could stay reduced for a very long time.”

Brad Pedersen is a staff writer for Trib Total Media. He can be reached at 724-543-1303, ext. 1337, or bpedersen@tribweb.com.

 

 

 
 


Show commenting policy

Most-Read Armstrong

  1. Dying trees removed from Ford City park
  2. Rayburn businessman honored for charitable work
  3. Kittanning Elks turns into museum during Fort Armstrong fest
  4. Armstrong bridge repair more costly than expected
  5. Heavy rains pour through Armstrong County
  6. Mayflies making Ford City roads slick for drivers
  7. Ford City wrestles with $600K question
  8. Family to rebuild Manor home destroyed by fire
  9. Armstrong Concert Band performing Saturday in Ford Cliff
  10. West Mahoning toddler run over by pickup truck
  11. Locals urged to report, not kill honeybees
Subscribe today! Click here for our subscription offers.