Share This Page

Kittanning officials plan street repairs

| Tuesday, March 4, 2014, 12:27 a.m.

It looks as if Kittanning will finally get some of its streets fixed.

On Monday, council approved pledging its allocated liquid fuels money to borrow $700,000 from the state and approved bidding out the project this spring.

“The condition of our streets is deplorable,” said Council President Randy Cloak.

Council authorized Mike Malak of Senate Engineering to prepare project specifications and advertise for bids.

Councilman David Croyle cast the lone dissenting vote.

“I'm not against the paving project,” Croyle said after the meeting. “However, Senate Engineering did not do their homework and gave general figures and not specific numbers.”

Cloak initially proposed that council apply for a 10-year note at 1.6 percent interest from the state in the amount of $600,000 to fix the designated streets.

However, Croyle asked that the requested amount be raised from $600,000 to $700,000 to ensure that any unforeseen project costs would be covered and that none of the designated streets would have to be cut from the project.

“My main concern is that the borough will take a hit because we didn't do the research,” Croyle said.

Council voted 8-0 in favor of borrowing that amount.

Those streets include Jacob Street from Water to North Grant Avenue; North Grant Avenue from Union Avenue to Chestnut Street; North Water Street from Market to Vine streets; North Water Street from Hazel to Monteith streets; and North Water Street from High Street to Union Avenue.

Two other streets —where North McKean meets Market Street and where Jefferson Street meets Market — will be fixed at a later date, said Mayor Kirk Atwood. He explained that a separate downtown revitalization project may end up affecting those streets.

To fix them now would be a waste of money, Atwood said.

Council is confident the borough will have more than enough money to pay off the low-interest loan within the next 10 years while keeping up with additional street repairs.

“Kittanning is set to get 60 percent more money (from the liquid fuels fund) than in the past,” Cloak said.

This year the borough will receive about $85,000 in state liquid fuels money with expected revenue increases each year, he said.

The first loan payment of about $40,000 will be due next year, so it will not affect this year's budget, Cloak said, adding that additional annual payments are expected to decrease by $10,000.

Brigid Beatty is a staff writer for Trib Total Media. She can be reached at 724-543-1303 or bbeatty@tribweb.com.

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.