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Kittanning's new meter attendant alert to red flags

| Wednesday, March 12, 2014, 1:48 p.m.
Louis B. Ruediger
Amanda King stands near a pair of meters along South Jefferson Street while on her first day as parking meter attendant in Kittanning. Tuesday, March 11, 2014.

Motorists who plan to park in Kittanning during business hours better remember to bring along some change — because there's a new meter attendant in town.

Amanda King, 29, started the job on Tuesday, filling a part-time post that had been vacant since 2011.

“So far, so good — I haven't gotten yelled at yet,” she said as she made her way down South Jefferson Street wearing a blue uniform while patrolling the streets where she lives.

King was one of 11 candidates who applied for the job, which often brings scorn from those who fail to put change in the meter when running into a store downtown. King said the job appealed to her because it gives her a chance to work outside. And it allows her the flexibility to continue working at her other part-time job as a gas station clerk.

The hiring committee — made up of Mayor Kirk Atwood, police Chief Bruce Mathews and Councilmen Ange Turco, Richard Reedy and David Croyle — interviewed the candidates on Thursday.

They said they were looking for someone with the right combination of personality and schedule availability.

“You want someone who is polite, who represents the borough well,” Mathews said. “And you want someone who is levelheaded and who can address problems.”

King fit the bill.

“She handles herself very well,” Mathews said.

In past years when there was an attendant, parking meter revenue has brought in about $61,000 a year, Councilman David Croyle said. Last year without an attendant, only about $46,000 was collected.

This year, because of the late start in hiring a meter attendant, the revenue is expected to be about $45,000.

However, some of that money may be recouped from a parking-violation fine increase from $2 to $5, which goes into effect on Friday, and converting all meters to accept only quarters by year's end.

Meter enforcement time is 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Mondays through Fridays.

King said that when friends found out about her new job, they pleaded with her not to write a ticket should they ever be caught with a parking violation.

“I just tell them ‘just pay your quarter,' ” she said, smiling.

Brigid Beatty is a staff writer for Trib Total Media. She can be reached at 724-543-1303 or bbeatty@tribweb.com.

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