TribLIVE

| News

 
Larger text Larger text Smaller text Smaller text | Order Photo Reprints

Manor family picking up pieces after losing house to fire

Email Newsletters

Click here to sign up for one of our email newsletters.

'American Coyotes' Series

Traveling by Jeep, boat and foot, Tribune-Review investigative reporter Carl Prine and photojournalist Justin Merriman covered nearly 2,000 miles over two months along the border with Mexico to report on coyotes — the human traffickers who bring illegal immigrants into the United States. Most are Americans working for money and/or drugs. This series reports how their operations have a major impact on life for residents and the environment along the border — and beyond.

Thursday, May 15, 2014, 12:51 a.m.
 

A Manor family of five displaced from their one-story home when fire destroyed it Tuesday evening is picking up the pieces with help from their neighbors and church.

Homeowner Joe Wienskovich, who was not at home when the fire at 106 Midway started about 4:30 p.m., said his wife, Amy, and their three children — ages 5, 11 and 12 — were there and got out safely with their dog and a pet bird. Comet, a gray male cat, is missing.

Wienskovich said the fire started when his 12-year-old son was playing with matches in a back bedroom of the home. He said his son has developmental issues, but declined to elaborate.

“Hopefully, it will get enough parents to talk to their kids,” he said. “Everybody got out OK — there's just some emotional scarring.”

Wienskovich teared up when he talked about how his family has been affected.

“It's all our kids have known,” he said about the home they have owned for 16 years.

He said his 5-year-old daughter is upset that all her stuff is gone. His 11-year-old son is focused on the future, specifically playing baseball on Wednesday with the Ford City Pony League.

“We're all looking forward to the game to get our mind off this,” he said.

He wiped his eyes and said the team had a new uniform waiting for his son. Behind him was the charred remains of the family home.

The house was insured, Wienskovich said, adding “I think some stuff is going to be salvageable.”

Neighbors, friends and members of the Kiski Valley Presbyterian Church, where Wienskovich serves as deacon, have stepped in with financial donations. So have the owners of Bachman Trucking of Natrona Heights, where Wienskovich works.

Within hours of the fire, the neighborhood collected $600 for the family.

“This is a neighborhood where you know your neighbors and where you can count on your neighbors,” Wienskovich said.

He said the family is staying with relatives and is grateful for the outpouring of generosity, but didn't want to have to accept any more donations.

“We've already turned down the Red Cross. Prayers are what we ask for,” he said.

Brigid Beatty is a staff writer for Trib Total Media. She can be reached at 724-543-1303 or bbeatty@tribweb.com.

Subscribe today! Click here for our subscription offers.

 

 


Show commenting policy

Most-Read Armstrong

  1. Police: Escaped Armstrong County inmate armed dangerous homicide suspect
  2. Worker injured when excavator backs over him in Kittanning
  3. Armstrong reaches out for opinions about how to use closed schools
  4. Kittanning road work a dusty backdrop to sidewalk sales, festival
  5. South Buffalo airport gets Armstrong County funding for study
  6. Rural Valley judge hanging up robes after 34 years on the bench
  7. Ownerless emu finds ‘buddy’ at new Greensburg home
  8. Newest council member aims to make Ford City ‘best it can be’
  9. Plea withdrawals made harder by Pennsylvania Supreme Court
  10. Explosive second day at Camp Cadet in Manor
  11. Beloved horse prepares for last appearance at Fort Armstrong rodeo