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Heavy rains pour through Armstrong County

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Tuesday, July 29, 2014, 12:11 a.m.
 

A lightning show and heavy rains on Sunday kept residents and emergency responders in Armstrong County busy into Monday morning dealing with minor floods and about a dozen downed trees and power wires.

“I heard it pouring pretty hard last night, and when I woke up this morning and looked out into the yard, it looked like Niagara Falls was here,” Kittanning resident Bonnie McMillen said, standing outside her home on Johnston Street. “I've got a gully in my backyard now.”

Water from a backed-up drain on Sinwell Street tore through the McMillens' yard, uprooting sections of lawn and leaving mud, rocks and other debris in its tracks.

“It's amazing what heavy rains can do,” McMillen said.

Lee Hendricks, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service in Moon, said the storms dropped about 1 to 2.2 inches of rain across Armstrong, Indiana and Venango counties.

“We don't have exact wind speeds, but there were fairly strong thunderstorms in the area,” Hendricks said. “And the entire region had a fairly nice light show because of all the lightning.”

Emergency crews responded to reports of flooded basements in East Franklin, Manorville, West Kittanning and Rayburn, said Randy Brozenick, Armstrong County director of public safety. Residents in Manor lost power from about 9 p.m. Sunday to 6 a.m. Monday when high winds downed power lines in the area.

“Luckily, that was our biggest issue,” Brozenick said. “We don't have anybody left without power.”

Brad Pedersen is a staff writer for Trib Total Media. He can be reached at 724-543-1303, ext. 1337, or bpedersen@tribweb.com.

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