TribLIVE

| News

 
Larger text Larger text Smaller text Smaller text | Order Photo Reprints

Students, ALS win when Shannock Valley principal takes Ice Bucket Challenge

Louis B. Ruediger | TRIB TOTAL MEDIA - Principal Jennifer Reiter takes the Ice Bucket Challenge. Student Edward Stubrick (right) had the honor of dumping the bucket on the principal because he raised the most money for ALS. Teacher Lori Gamble assisted Stubrick with the bucket.
<div style='float:right;width:100%;' align='right'><em>Louis B. Ruediger | TRIB TOTAL MEDIA</em></div>Principal Jennifer Reiter takes the Ice Bucket Challenge. Student Edward Stubrick (right) had the honor of dumping the bucket on the principal because he raised the most money for ALS. Teacher Lori Gamble assisted Stubrick with the bucket.
Louis B. Ruediger | TRIB TOTAL MEDIA - Students react as teachers take the Ice Bucket Challenge. Thursday August 28, 2014.
<div style='float:right;width:100%;' align='right'><em>Louis B. Ruediger | TRIB TOTAL MEDIA</em></div>Students react as teachers take the Ice Bucket Challenge. Thursday August 28, 2014.
Louis B. Ruediger | TRIB TOTAL MEDIA - Principal Jennifer Reiter is well equipped to take the Ice Bucket Challenge. Edward Stubrick poses with the principal just before got to dump a bucket of ice water on her.
<div style='float:right;width:100%;' align='right'><em>Louis B. Ruediger | TRIB TOTAL MEDIA</em></div>Principal Jennifer Reiter is well equipped to take the Ice Bucket Challenge.  Edward Stubrick poses with the principal just before got to dump a bucket of ice water on her.

Email Newsletters

Click here to sign up for one of our email newsletters.

'American Coyotes' Series

Traveling by Jeep, boat and foot, Tribune-Review investigative reporter Carl Prine and photojournalist Justin Merriman covered nearly 2,000 miles over two months along the border with Mexico to report on coyotes — the human traffickers who bring illegal immigrants into the United States. Most are Americans working for money and/or drugs. This series reports how their operations have a major impact on life for residents and the environment along the border — and beyond.

Friday, Aug. 29, 2014, 12:26 a.m.
 

Chucking a bucket of ice water over the principal's head won't land second-grader Edward Stubrick in any kind of trouble. Instead, the act won the Shannock Valley Elementary student applause from his classmates and approval from teachers.

“It felt good,” Stubrick said with a grin after drenching Principal Jennifer Reiter in the school's back parking lot on Thursday.

He won the honor because he had raised $110 – the top amount brought in by a student – during the school's three-day fundraising Ice Bucket Challenge event to benefit the ALS Association.

Students raised $1,224.38 as part of their contribution to the national bucket challenge that was started to fight the crippling disease amyotrophic lateral sclerosis — most commonly known as Lou Gehrig's disease.

Massachusetts resident Pete Frates and his family are credited with starting the challenge on July 29, according to the ALS Association website.

Since then it has become a viral sensation on social media, with participants posting videos of getting doused and issuing challenges to folks they know.

The idea is for people to act within 24 hours of being challenged or pay $100 to the ALS Association, although most give whatever they can whether or not they have taken a bucket of ice water over their head.

The ALS Association has received more than $94.3 million in donations since the Ice Bucket Challenge started.

Reiter and other teachers were nominated for the challenge by people they knew, which got Reiter thinking: “What better way to get the school together than for a good cause like this?”

“I offered myself up for sacrifice and asked the staff to join me,” she said.

Students seated on the grassy lawn applauded loudly when Reiter announced how much they had raised.

And they cheered when she issued a challenge to Dayton Elementary — where she is also principal — and to Lenape and West Hills elementary schools.

But those cheers were nothing compared with the loud, gleeful noise that erupted when their principal, sporting a pink and blue plastic snorkel and flippers, got drenched.

Stubrick was among 14 students who lined up to tip ice water over staff and faculty members.

Teachers gasped, laughed and hugged their half-pint assailants.

“They did an awesome job,” said the soaked and dripping principal.

Brigid Beatty is a staff writer for Trib Total Media.

Subscribe today! Click here for our subscription offers.

 

 


Show commenting policy

Most-Read Armstrong

  1. Natural soaps, spinning demo among attractions at Fort Armstrong Folk Festival
  2. Paradise Park Rib Fest reviving legendary stage in Cowansville
  3. Worker injured when excavator backs over him in Kittanning
  4. West Kittanning church marks 100 years of ups and downs
  5. 44th Folk Festival off to bustling start in Kittanning
  6. Kittanning road work a dusty backdrop to sidewalk sales, festival
  7. Armstrong reaches out for opinions about how to use closed schools
  8. Police: Escaped Armstrong County inmate armed, dangerous homicide suspect
  9. Plea withdrawals made harder by Pennsylvania Supreme Court
  10. South Buffalo airport gets Armstrong County funding for study
  11. Rural Valley judge hanging up robes after 34 years on the bench