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Butler County's 1st natural gas station open for business

| Sunday, Sept. 8, 2013, 12:11 a.m.
Philip G. Pavely | Tribune-Review
The GetGo Compressed Natural Gas station opened in Cranberry Thursday, September 5, 2013. The station is close to Interstate 79 and the Pennsylvania Turnpike and increases access to compressed natural gas for motorists driving vehicles fueled by the material CNG is typically priced one-third below the cost of gasoline as well as reducing emissions.
Philip G. Pavely | Tribune-Review
Robert C. DeLucia, Sr. fills up a vehicle at the GetGo in Cranberry Thursday, September 5, 2013. DeLucia, who has a fleet of 25 vehicles based in Cranberry, used to have to go into Pittsburgh for re-fueling before the first GetGo branded Compressed Natural Gas offering opened. CNG is typically priced one-third below the cost of gasoline as well as reducing emissions. The GetGo compressed natural gas station opened Thursday, September 5, 2013.
Philip G. Pavely | Tribune-Review
Robert C. DeLucia, Sr. fills up a vehicle at the GetGo in Cranberry Thursday, September 5, 2013. DeLucia, who has a fleet of 25 vehicles based in Cranberry, used to have to go into Pittsburgh for re-fueling before the first GetGo branded Compressed Natural Gas offering opened. CNG is typically priced one-third below the cost of gasoline as well as reducing emissions. The GetGo station opened Thursday, September 5, 2013.
Philip G. Pavely | Tribune-Review
Robert C. DeLucia, Sr. fills up a vehicle at the GetGo in Cranberry Thursday, September 5, 2013. DeLucia, who has a fleet of 25 vehicles based in Cranberry, used to have to go into Pittsburgh for re-fueling before the first GetGo branded Compressed Natural Gas offering opened. CNG is typically priced one-third below the cost of gasoline as well as reducing emissions.The GetGo compressed natural gas station opened Thursday, September 5, 2013.
Philip G. Pavely | Tribune-Review
The GetGo Compressed Natural Gas offering in Cranberry Thursday, September 5, 2013. CNG is typically priced one-third below the cost of gasoline as well as reducing emissions. The GetGo compressed natural gas station opened Thursday, September 5, 2013.
Philip G. Pavely | Tribune-Review
Lauren Eckels, an intern for Pittsburgh Region Clean Cities, fills up a vehicle at the GetGo in Cranberry Thursday, September 5, 2013. The GetGo compressed natural gas station opened Thursday, September 5, 2013.
Philip G. Pavely | Tribune-Review
Robert C. DeLucia, Sr. fills up a vehicle at the GetGo in Cranberry Thursday, September 5, 2013. DeLucia, who has a fleet of 25 vehicles based in Cranberry, used to have to go into Pittsburgh for re-fueling before the first GetGo branded Compressed Natural Gas offering opened. CNG is typically priced one-third below the cost of gasoline as well as reducing emissions. The GetGo compressed natural gas station opened Thursday, September 5, 2013.

Giant Eagle Inc. opened Butler County's first natural gas refueling station on Thursday at a spot that gas boosters hope will be crucial for the expanded use of natural gas in the region's cars.

The station is at a GetGo on Route 228 in Cranberry, near both Interstate 79 and the Pennsylvania Turnpike, one of the busiest junctures in Western Pennsylvania.

“We have offered various alternative fuels at select GetGo locations for a number of years, and are excited to be introducing (compressed natural gas) into this mix,” said Dave Daniel, Giant Eagle's vice president of GetGo operations. “We're excited to make CNG widely available outside of downtown Pittsburgh.”

In part because of production from Marcellus shale regions, CNG now is half the price of gasoline, leading several companies nationwide to start converting their truck fleets to natural gas fuel. Giant Eagle is one of them, adding more than 20 natural gas-fueled trucks.

Gas drillers and advocates are hoping that leads to more filling stations, encouraging the driving public to adopt the cheaper fuel.

Giant Eagle opened its first two CNG stations, including one open to the public, in Fairywood in 2011.

Timothy Puko is a staff writer for Trib Total Media. He can be reached at 412-320-7991 or tpuko@tribweb.com.

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