Share This Page

Kids Castle in Cranberry Community Park nears completion

| Saturday, Sept. 21, 2013, 9:00 p.m.
Philip G. Pavely | Tribune-Review
Work continues around the Kids Castle playground at Cranberry Community Park Wednesday, September 18, 2013. The brand-new play area is spread out over one-acre in the park.
Philip G. Pavely | Tribune-Review
Work continues around the Kids Castle playground at Cranberry Community Park Wednesday, September 18, 2013. The brand-new play area is spread out over one-acre in the park.
Philip G. Pavely | Tribune-Review
Russ Baker, with General Recreation, spreads out the newly dumped rubber at Cranberry Community Park Wednesday, September 18, 2013. The brand-new play area is spread out over one-acre in the park.
Philip G. Pavely | Tribune-Review
Russ Baker, with General Recreation, spreads out the newly dumped rubber at Cranberry Community Park Wednesday, September 18, 2013. The brand-new play area is spread out over one-acre in the park.

The new, one-of-a-kind Kids Castle Playground at Cranberry Community Park is nearing completion after months of fundraising, planning and construction.

“It will be a very special playground and one that involved over 5,000 people to make a reality. And that is what makes it a ‘community' playground,” said township supervisor Bruce Mazzoni.

A dedication ceremony at 4:30 p.m. Thursday will mark the official opening of the community-designed facility.

The Cranberry Township Community Chest selected the playground as its 2013 community project of the year. The community chest committed $50,000 toward the nearly $500,000 cost of the Kids Castle playground to be used for playground equipment.

Additional funding came from a slew of sources, including local businesses, organizations and community members.

“It's been all hands on deck,” said township Manager Jerry Andree. “Everybody is involved with the playground.”

The Kids Castle will consist of three distinct parts that reflect Cranberry's history and future, Andree said.

The Yesterday area will have swings, climbing areas, rolling hills and riding animals, according plans on the community chest website. The Today area will have a custom-built play area and feature a clock tower similar to the one at the municipal building. The Tomorrow area will have the latest in play structures and playground technology.

“It creates a lot of interplay,” Andree said.

He said there will also be places for parents and other adults to sit while children play.

“It's much more than a kid's playground. It's more of a family retreat area,” Andree said.

Kids Castle is replacing the old Playtime Palace, which was opened in 1990.

Volunteers from Westinghouse Electric Co. and Alcoa, Inc. helped dismantle the old Playtime Palace in April.

Some of the wood from Playtime Palace was pressure-washed and stained for use in the Yesterday section of the Kids Castle.

Construction on the new playground began in mid-July, Andree said. Hundreds of people volunteered in shifts to help build the Today section of the playground during a community-build weekend in August.

Cranberry officials said the Playtime Palace was too old to maintain and did not comply with current safety standards.

The new playground is built from materials that will not rot and require less maintenance, Mazzoni said. It will also exceed Public Playground Safety Guidelines standards and Americans With Disabilities Act requirements.

“Many pieces of the equipment are very unique and one of a kind,” Mazzoni said.

Rachel Farkas is a staff writer for Trib Total Media. She can be reached at 724-779-6902 or rfarkas@tribweb.com.

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.