Share This Page

Cranberry police pledge to guard Scouting Centennial Plaza from more vandalism

| Saturday, March 22, 2014, 2:34 p.m.
Philip G. Pavely | Tribune-Review
Rich Gall, a crew leader for Graham Park in Cranberry, pulls the final piece of debris from the fishing lake at Scouting Centennial Plaza on Wednesday, March, 19, 2014. Vandals March 16 caused more than $10,000 in damage. Garbage cans were tossed into the water, lights were broken, sinks pulled from the walls, downspouts ripped off and flags stolen.
Philip G. Pavely | Tribune-Review
Items damaged by vandals at Scouting Centennial Plaza and Fishing Lake in Graham Park in Cranberry sometime Sunday, March 16, 2014, line a wall Wednesday, March, 19, 2014. Vandals caused more than $10,000 in damage. Garbage cans were tossed into the water, lights were broken, sinks pulled from the walls, downspouts ripped off and flags stolen.
Philip G. Pavely | Tribune-Review
Rich Gall, a crew leader for Graham Park in Cranberry, latches onto the final piece of debris from the fishing lake at Scouting Centennial Plaza on Wednesday, March, 19, 2014. Vandals March 16 caused more than $10,000 in damage.

Days after vandals struck Cranberry's Graham Park, township crews were still retrieving items dumped into the fishing lake at Scouting Centennial Plaza.

“It's upsetting. They (vandals) should have a better use of their time,” said Erin McClymonds of Cranberry.

Members of the McClymonds family were major donors to the park's Centennial Plaza project, dedicated in 2012 to honor a century of scouting.

A plaque there memorializes the late John McClymonds, who owned Cranberry Supply Co. He died in 2011.

Erin McClymonds, who is McClymonds' daughter-in-law, said the plaza “is one of the shining stars of the Cranberry park system.”

“I sincerely hope they're able to find these individuals and have them out there fixing what they broke,” she said.

The vandals struck the park the night of March 16, a Sunday, said Cranberry police Sgt. Chuck Mascellino. They damaged lighting fixtures, several downspouts and a public bathroom. They threw trash and the lid of a garbage can into the fishing lake and damaged lighting around flagpoles. They took several American flags, plus a blue Boy Scout flag and a green-and-white Girl Scout flag.

The Cranberry Township Community Chest announced Thursday it was donating $10,000 toward repairs.

The organization and many of its board members had been instrumental in the development of Graham Park.

The scouting flags went up for the first time this season days before the vandals hit. Finding the 3-by-5-foot flags could give police a clue as to who was responsible for the damage, Mascellino said. Township officials estimated the damage at about $20,000.

Police have talked to nearby businesses on Rochester Road to determine if surveillance footage is available, Mascellino said. Police will have “an increased presence” in the park, Mascellino said.

“We patrol everything as much as we can,” he said.

Initially, police thought the vandalism occurred between the night of March 14 and the morning of March 17.

But after police released details, people reported seeing no damage on March 14 or 15, and police revised their theory. Vandals damage township parks several times a year, Mascellino said.

The damage this time was more costly than normal, he said.

Anyone with information is asked to call Cranberry police at 724-776-5180, ext. 5.

The park also contains the Dick's Sporting Goods Sportsplex and the Miracle League of Southwestern Pennsylvania, which allows children with special needs to play baseball.

Bill Vidonic is a staff writer for Trib Total Media. He can be reached at 412-380-5621 or bvidonic@tribweb.com.

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.