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Monument dedicated to 1st Butler resident to die in Vietnam

| Saturday, Aug. 16, 2014, 6:03 p.m.
Jasmine Goldband | Trib Total Media
Veteran Art Greathead, left, Cindy Murphy Klein and Linda Dublin Nelson, remember Marine PFC Paul E. Angert, the first fatality from the city of Butler to die in the Vietnam war on April 28, 1970 during a dedication ceremony in his honor at Rotary Park in Butler Wed., Aug. 13, 2014. Klein was engaged to be married to Angert when he was killed and Nelson is Angert's cousin.
Jasmine Goldband | Trib Total Media
World War II veteran Jim Herold, 92 of Butler, center, pays respects to Marine PFC Paul E. Angert, the first fatality from the city of Butler to die in the Vietnam war on April 28, 1970 during a dedication ceremony in his honor at Rotary Park in Butler Wed., Aug. 13, 2014.
Jasmine Goldband | Trib Total Media
Linda Dublin Nelson, left, and Cindy Murphy Klein unveil a monument honoring Marine PFC Paul E. Angert, the first fatality from the city of Butler to die in the Vietnam war on April 28, 1970 during a dedication ceremony in his honor at Rotary Park in Butler Wed., Aug. 13, 2014. Nelson is Angert's cousin and Klein was engaged to be married to Angert when he was killed.

The first member of the military from the city of Butler to die in the Vietnam War will never be forgotten.

Butler dedicated a monument on Wednesday to Marine Corps Pfc. Paul E. Angert, who was 18 when he was killed in action on April 28, 1970, in Quang Nam Province, South Vietnam, where some of the heaviest fighting of the war occurred.

He was the 34th member of the armed services from Butler County to die in Vietnam.

Records from the Vietnam Veterans Memorial website indicate Angert was an antitank assaultman with the 7th Marine Regiment.

Angert's family received permission in the 1990s to build a monument to their son on his childhood playground in Rotary Park.

Over the years, the monument fell into disrepair, so Puff and fellow Bantam Marine League member Sam Zurzolo tried to repair it.

Angert joined the Marines with six months of high school left and upon graduation immediately went to Parris Island, S.C., to finish combat training.

He went to Vietnam in January 1970 and died three months later.

The new memorial took Puff and Zurzolo three months and hundreds of hours to complete with the help of Justin Ellis, who worked on the monument as part of an Eagle Scout project, and community members who helped clean sidewalks and donated a 30-foot flagpole.

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