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Father of IBM personal computer dies at 72

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By The Associated Press
Thursday, Oct. 31, 2013, 11:42 a.m.
 

CHICAGO — The former IBM executive credited with helping to bring personal computers to the masses has died in Illinois.

William C. Lowe oversaw the birth of IBM's first personal computer, which was introduced in retail stores in 1981.

His daughter Michelle Marshall says Lowe died on Oct. 19 in Lake Forest, Ill., of a heart attack. He was 72.

Other companies were making PCs as early as the 1970s, but IBM was behind the curve.

The company's website says Lowe was lab director at IBM's Boca Raton, Fla., facilities when he convinced his bosses that he could assemble a team to build a personal computer in a year. He did it by using parts and software from outside developers.

That first IBM personal computer cost $1,565, not including a monitor.

 

 
 


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