TribLIVE

| News


 
Larger text Larger text Smaller text Smaller text | Order Photo Reprints

Father of IBM personal computer dies at 72

By The Associated Press
Thursday, Oct. 31, 2013, 11:42 a.m.
 

CHICAGO — The former IBM executive credited with helping to bring personal computers to the masses has died in Illinois.

William C. Lowe oversaw the birth of IBM's first personal computer, which was introduced in retail stores in 1981.

His daughter Michelle Marshall says Lowe died on Oct. 19 in Lake Forest, Ill., of a heart attack. He was 72.

Other companies were making PCs as early as the 1970s, but IBM was behind the curve.

The company's website says Lowe was lab director at IBM's Boca Raton, Fla., facilities when he convinced his bosses that he could assemble a team to build a personal computer in a year. He did it by using parts and software from outside developers.

That first IBM personal computer cost $1,565, not including a monitor.

Subscribe today! Click here for our subscription offers.

 

 


Show commenting policy

Most-Read Stories

  1. Ford City High School class of 1951 offering scholarship
  2. Paddlers prepare for annual Armstrong sojourn in May
  3. Armstrong agency gets money to help needy in emergencies
  4. Penguins slip past Sharks, 3-2, in shootout
  5. Program details women’s work in Mon-Yough area mills during World War II
  6. NFL coaches weigh in on Polamalu’s legacy
  7. Pirates’ outfield may have few defensive peers
  8. Hempfield infant fights rare disease
  9. New Castle-area racino remains in limbo
  10. Penguins’ Letang leaves hospital, ‘day-to-day’ with concussion
  11. Players, casinos pan IRS idea to track more slot payouts