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German 'lost art' site posting another 101 works

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A combo made on Nov. 28, 2013, of handout photos made available by German prosecutors of Augsburg on the German Federal official website Lostart shows artworks (from to left to bottom right) identified as 'Arab riding on horseback', 'Joseph and his brothers', 'Two Men', 'Lioness' by French artist Eugene Delacroix, 'Puttos (Cherubs) in disguise' by French painter Antoine Watteau, 'Farmwoman (countrywoman) harvesting hay' by Pissaro, 'Portrait of a lady' by Paul Gaugin, 'Angler' by Cezanne, 'Knight in sickbed' by Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres, 'Torrero' by Eugene Delacroix, 'Woman' by Edgar Degas, 'Female Portrait' and 'Portrait of a Lady' by Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres, and 'Landscape with cattle and herdswoman' by Jean-Baptiste-Camille Corot, that all belong to the 1,400 treasured art works 'for which there is strong suspicion that they were seized as part of Nazi persecution' and that were seized in February 2012 in a Munich apartment.

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By The Associated Press

Published: Thursday, Nov. 28, 2013, 3:27 p.m.

BERLIN — German authorities are posting online another 101 works from the huge trove of art found at a reclusive collector's apartment in Munich, bringing the total so far to 219.

The task force looking into the find said Thursday that prosecutors in Augsburg have cleared drawings and watercolors by artists including Edgar Degas, Paul Cezanne, Pablo Picasso, Eugene Delacroix, Honore Daumier and Albrecht Duerer for posting on the official “Lost Art” website . They're among the works officials believe may have been seized under the Nazis.

Authorities found more than 1,400 works of art at Cornelius Gurlitt's Munich apartment last year while investigating a tax case. Prosecutors are checking whether up to 590 pieces were seized by the Nazis.

Officials started gradually posting the works online earlier this month.

 

 
 


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