Share This Page

German 'lost art' site posting another 101 works

| Thursday, Nov. 28, 2013, 3:27 p.m.
AFP/Getty Images
A combo made on Nov. 28, 2013, of handout photos made available by German prosecutors of Augsburg on the German Federal official website Lostart shows artworks (from to left to bottom right) identified as 'Arab riding on horseback', 'Joseph and his brothers', 'Two Men', 'Lioness' by French artist Eugene Delacroix, 'Puttos (Cherubs) in disguise' by French painter Antoine Watteau, 'Farmwoman (countrywoman) harvesting hay' by Pissaro, 'Portrait of a lady' by Paul Gaugin, 'Angler' by Cezanne, 'Knight in sickbed' by Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres, 'Torrero' by Eugene Delacroix, 'Woman' by Edgar Degas, 'Female Portrait' and 'Portrait of a Lady' by Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres, and 'Landscape with cattle and herdswoman' by Jean-Baptiste-Camille Corot, that all belong to the 1,400 treasured art works 'for which there is strong suspicion that they were seized as part of Nazi persecution' and that were seized in February 2012 in a Munich apartment.

BERLIN — German authorities are posting online another 101 works from the huge trove of art found at a reclusive collector's apartment in Munich, bringing the total so far to 219.

The task force looking into the find said Thursday that prosecutors in Augsburg have cleared drawings and watercolors by artists including Edgar Degas, Paul Cezanne, Pablo Picasso, Eugene Delacroix, Honore Daumier and Albrecht Duerer for posting on the official “Lost Art” website. They're among the works officials believe may have been seized under the Nazis.

Authorities found more than 1,400 works of art at Cornelius Gurlitt's Munich apartment last year while investigating a tax case. Prosecutors are checking whether up to 590 pieces were seized by the Nazis.

Officials started gradually posting the works online earlier this month.

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.