ShareThis Page

Freshmen descend on Point Park University on move-in day

Emily Balser
| Thursday, Aug. 24, 2017, 4:36 p.m.
Incoming students, parents and volunteers with Point Park University cross the Boulevard of the Allies during 'freshmen move-in day' for Point Park's downtown campus, Thursday, Aug. 24, 2017.
Andrew Russell | Tribune-Review
Incoming students, parents and volunteers with Point Park University cross the Boulevard of the Allies during 'freshmen move-in day' for Point Park's downtown campus, Thursday, Aug. 24, 2017.
Mei Lu Barnum, 19, and Kristopher Chandeler, 21, both volunteers with Point Park University laugh on the way back to the parking lot during 'freshmen move-in day' for Point Park's downtown campus, Thursday, Aug. 24, 2017.
Andrew Russell | Tribune-Review
Mei Lu Barnum, 19, and Kristopher Chandeler, 21, both volunteers with Point Park University laugh on the way back to the parking lot during 'freshmen move-in day' for Point Park's downtown campus, Thursday, Aug. 24, 2017.
Incoming Freshman, Tyler Rodgers, 18, of Indiana is reflected in a mirror as Monae Findley, with Point Park University helps unload Tucker's car during 'freshmen move-in day' for Point Park's downtown campus, Thursday, Aug. 24, 2017.
Andrew Russell | Tribune-Review
Incoming Freshman, Tyler Rodgers, 18, of Indiana is reflected in a mirror as Monae Findley, with Point Park University helps unload Tucker's car during 'freshmen move-in day' for Point Park's downtown campus, Thursday, Aug. 24, 2017.
Lauren Blum, (left) and Chelsea Yonash, both with Point Park University unload a incoming freshmen's car during 'freshmen move-in day' for Point Park's downtown campus, Thursday, Aug. 24, 2017.
Andrew Russell | Tribune-Review
Lauren Blum, (left) and Chelsea Yonash, both with Point Park University unload a incoming freshmen's car during 'freshmen move-in day' for Point Park's downtown campus, Thursday, Aug. 24, 2017.

Dozens of volunteers operated like a well-oiled machine to move in hundreds of Point Park University freshman on Thursday.

The urban campus has a unique set of challenges since it's situated right in the hustle and bustle of downtown Pittsburgh. The university has created a system for move-in that is performed by volunteers and frees up families to say their goodbyes and explore the city.

"It's all hands on deck," said Chelsea Yohash, graduate assistant for the university's Department of Student Affairs. "We all come together and help the families and the students move in."

She and dozens of student and faculty volunteers unloaded cars and sorted items into bins that were wheeled down Boulevard of the Allies and into the freshman dorms.

Although the urban environment can pose some move-in challenges, it's is also the reason that many students choose Point Park.

Freshman Tiffany Walker, 18, moved in with the help of her mom, brother and a family friend.

She's majoring in cinema and looks forward to the opportunities Pittsburgh can offer. She comes from rural Somerset County.

"I prefer the city," she said. "I just like a busy lifestyle."

Walker dreams of being an actor and director.

"I definitely want to make films," Walker said. "I'm really excited to be creative."

Family friend Mark Gontis said he's looking forward to the success Walker will have with a college education.

"We'll see her on Broadway eventually," he said.

Freshman Danielle Warren, 18, from Clearfield, had help from her mom and both grandmothers. She's majoring in psychology.

"I'm excited to be in a new environment and meet new people," she said.

Warren's mom, Sandy Warren, said she's looking forward to her daughter making new friends and enjoying the city.

"I know she will succeed," Warren said.

Both grandmothers hope Warren will be able to secure a good job after college and have plenty of job opportunities.

"I think she'll get a good experience out of it," said Cindy Bailer, her maternal grandmother.

Freshman Jacob Blankenbaker, 18, from Maryland, chose Point Park because it was one of only a few schools to offer his major of intelligence and national security.

His parents hope he will be able to network and complete valuable internships while in Pittsburgh.

"There's so much to do here," said Julie Blankenbaker, his mother. "We love Pittsburgh."

Emily Balser is a Tribune-Review staff writer. Reach her at 724-226-4680, emilybalser@tribweb.com or on Twitter @emilybalser.

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.