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Upper Tyrone supervisors to study roads, speeding

| Saturday, Oct. 13, 2012, 12:02 a.m.

With safety issues a concern, Upper Tyrone Township supervisors have directed its engineering firm to assess three roads to determine if guiderails are needed.

Certain sections of Mt. East Road, Woods Road and Dry Hill Road will be studied. Engineers will perform ease assessments. Supervisors will decide at a later date if guiderails should be installed.

In other matters:

Supervisors plan to consider several options to combat speeding, such as creating speed humps on the township roads.

“A speed hump is different then a speed bump,” Edwards said. “A speed bump is short and high. A speed hump is lower, about two or three inches; they are about 10 to 12 feet long.”

Edwards said supervisors also can contact Everson and Scottdale police to determine whether either department can help with enforcing speed limits in problem areas.

Supervisors were asked for updates on a proposed sewage project. They have been trying to obtain funding for at least three years.

“Funding is hard to get, and we will be looking at a proposal tonight to finish the design,” said Supervisor Bill Edwards. “All I can say is that we are in the process.”

The state Department of Conservation and Natural Resources informed supervisors that it will extend a grant awarded to the Coal and Coke Trail extension project. Trail officials ran into problems acquiring rights-of-way in certain areas.

Supervisors hired Jacob Whipkey as a part-time laborer, at the rate of $12 an hour, with a six-month probationary period. The effective date of his start isn't determined yet.

Supervisors passed a motion to purchase a new F450 diesel dump truck through the COSTARS program.

Marilyn Forbes is a freelance writer.

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