Share This Page

Dec. 31 revelers warned: Police will be out in full force

| Monday, Dec. 31, 2012, 12:02 a.m.

It's New Year's Eve. For many, that means it's time to party.

But for area law enforcement, it's a night when their main goal will be trying to keep those on the area roadways safe.

Locally, Connellsville police will be out in full force on New Year's Eve.

They'll be keeping an eye out, not only for intoxicated drivers, but any other unusual behavior.

Sgt. Dan Sherbinsky said officers will be stationed in strategic locations throughout the city — and they'll be watching.

Connellsville police participate in the Smooth Operators Program, Sherbinsky said. It's a program that targets aggressive driving.

“We'll be out and we'll try to be more visible,” said Sherbinsky, explaining that the hope is that if the public recognizes the increased police presence, it will deter impaired or reckless driving as well as any other actions that could spoil someone's New Year's celebration.

“We want to try to prevent anything from happening,” Sherbinsky said.

Pennsylvania State Police Tpr. Stefani Plume, stationed in Uniontown, said state police advise anyone heading out to party on New Year's Eve — or any day — not to drink or drive. Police said a designated driver should be named.

“There is going to be a lot of people out and about on New Year's Eve,” said Plume, encouraging responsible partying and driving.

Sherbinsky said that the department will be ready for the extra traffic.

“There is going to be a lot of extra officers on duty,” Sherbinsky said.

Pennsylvania State Police Trooper Steven Limani, of the Greensburg barracks, said the state police centers its patrols on areas of high traffic and risk for the evening.

“During the holidays, we have officers assigned specifically for traffic enforcement in an effort to reduce crashes, specifically ones related to DUI,” Limani said. “We use a mapping system and track higher crash areas. We patrol those areas in an attempt to reduce those statistics.”

Limani said although it is considered to be a big drinking holiday, many people do act responsibly.

“Believe it or not, many people will make arrangements so they are not drinking and driving,” Limani said.

Limani said New Year's Eve is not the holiday when the largest number of DUIs arrests are made. Historically, he said, that would be the night before Thanksgiving.

“We just want people to be safe, be smart, wear your seat belts and use a little common sense,” Plume said.

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.